Aṅguttara Nikāya– Book of Gradual Sayings

1. Ekanipāta – 1. Book of Ones

1. Rūpavagga ṅ – 1. Chapter on Form

[1] (itthirūpa) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a man's mind as that of a woman's form.
[2] (itthisadda) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a man's mind as that of a woman's sound.
[3] (itthigandha) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a man's mind as that of a woman's smell.
[4] (itthirasa) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a man's mind as that of a woman's taste, .
[5] (itthipohoṭṭhabba) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a man's mind as that of a woman's touch .
[6] (purisarūpa) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a woman's mind as that of a man's form.
[7] (purisasadda) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a woman's mind as that of a man's sound.
[8] (purisaganda) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a woman's mind as that of a man's smell.
[9] (purisarasa) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a woman's mind as that of a man's taste.
[10] (purisapohotaṭṭabba) The Buddha said: "There is no other thing that affects a woman's mind as that of a man's touch.

2. Nīvaraṇappahānavagga – 2. Chapter on Abandoning hindrances

[11] (Subhanimitta) The Buddha said: "There is other single thing that arouses or increases lust than something beautiful.
[12] (Paṭighanimitta) The Buddha said: "There is no other single thing that causes malevolence than something repulsive.
[13] (Bhattasammada) The Buddha said: "There is no other single thing that causes sloth and torpor than drowsiness, over-eating and torpidity of mind.
[14] (Cetaso avūpasama) The Buddha said: "There is no other single thing that causes excitement than a dusturbed mind.
[15] (Ayonisomanasikāra) The Buddha said: "There is no other single thing that causes doubt as non-systematic attention.
[16] (Asubhanimitta) The Buddha said: "There is of no other single thing that prevents lust than something ugly.
[17] (Mettā cetovimutti) The Buddha said: " There is of no other single thing that prevents malevolence than a compassiopjnae mind.
[18] (Ārambha-nikkama-parakkama) The Buddha said: "There isno other single thing that prevents sloth and torpor than effort, exertion and striving.
[19] (Cetaso vūpasama) The Buddha said: "There is no other single thing that prevents excitement than tranqility of mind.
[20] (Yonisomanasikāra) The Buddha said: "There is no other single thing that prevents doubt as systemtic attention.

3. Akammaniyavagga – 3. Chapter on the Uncontrollable Mind

[NOTE: All statements in this and the following chapters are statements made by the Buddha to the monks at Sāvatthi.]

[21-30] These 10 suttas deal with the uncontrolledd mind (cittaṃ abh?vitaṃ and the controlled (or cultivated) mind (cittaṃ bh?vitaṃ). To the former is attribu to being intractable, condusive to loss, leading to suffering with the opposite attributed to the controlled mind.

4. Adantaaggavagga – 4. Chapter on the Untamed Mind

[31-40] These ten suttas are similar to the previous 10 sutas with the 'uncontrolled mind' replaced by the 'untamed mind' and the 'controlled mind' by the 'tamed mind'.

5. Paṇihitaaccavagga – 5. Chapter on the Directed Mind

[41-42] The parable of the pointed wheat cutting the hand is used to illustrate how a undirected mind will not pierce ignorance. Opposite for the directed mind..
[43-44] The Buddha can penetrate the mind of a monk with an undirected mind and determine that he will not reach Nibbāna. Opposite for a monk with a pure mind.
[45-46] Just as turbid water will prevent someone to seeing what is in it so one with a troubled mind will not be able to penetrate to the truth.
[47-50] Just as certain trees are noted for their pliability there is nothing more pliable than the mind which can change instantly.

6. Accarāsaṅgātavagga – 6. Chapter on the Finger Snap

[51-55] The mind is bright but is defiled from outside therefore the Ariyan disciple knows that it has to be cultivated. Evem if has thoughts of compassion for a single finger=snap he wuld have justified living on the alms food.
[56-60] All evil is caused by the mind. Negligence and indolence are the causes for the arising of evild thoughts

7. Vīriyātmbhādivagga – 7. Chapter on Energetic Effort

[61] The Buddha said: "There is no other cause for the arising of good states and the ending of bad ones than energetic effort."
[62-70] In these nine suttas the Buddha makes the saying with respect to energetic effort to apply to the five evil states (greediness, discontent, unsystematic attention, discomposure, and bad company) and the four good states (wanting little, contentment, systematic attention, and composure).

8. Kalyānṇamittādivagga – 7. Chapter on Sincere Friendship

[71] The Buddha said: "There is no other cause for the arising of good states and the ending of bad ones than sincere friendship."
[72-73] Same as above applied to the evil state of devotiohn to evil, and the good state of devotion to good.
[74-75] Same is applied to the non-arising of the limbs of widom by unsystematic attention, and the opposite through systematic attention.
[76-80] Same is applied to the loss of relatives, wealth and reputation by lack of widsom, and the opposite through increase of wisdom.

9. Pamādādivagga – 9. Chapter on Diligence

[81] The Buddha said: "The following things contribute to great loss and to great profit."
[82-83] The Buddha said: "Nothing contributes to great loss as negligence; nothing contributes to great profit as degligence."
[84-97] These 14 suttas apply the same format in relation to seven pairs of opposites: : indolence and energetic effort; wanting much and wanting little; discontent and contentment; systematic attention and unsystematic attention; friendship with the bad and friendship with the sincere; devotion to bad things and devotion to good things.

10. Dutiyapamādādivagga – 10. Second Chapter on Diligence

In the following suttas same format as in the previous chapter is applied to the following pairs of opposites the first negatively and the second positively:
[98-99] Negligence and diligence (internal self); [100-101] Indolence and energetic effort (internal self); [102-103] Wanting much and wanting little; [104-105] Discontent and contentment; [106-107] Systematic attention and unsystematic attention; [108-109 ] Discomposure and composure; [110-111] Friendship with the evil persons and and with sincere friends; [112-113] Bad deeds and good deeds; [114-115] Negligence and diligence (in relation to the disappearance/establishment of the Dhamma).

In the following suttas same format as in the previous pair of suttas is applied to the following pairs of opposites the first in relation to the disappearance of the Dhamma and the second in relation to the establishment of the Dhamma:
[116-117] indolence and energetic effort; \\ ose monks who point out what is not Dhammal as Dhamma, such conduct of theirs is to the loss of many folk, to the misery of many folk, to the loss, the injury, the misery of devas and mankind. Moreover, such beget great demerit and cause the disappearance of this true Dhamma. [118-119] wanting much and wanting little; [120-121] discontent and contentment; [122-123] systematic attention and unsystematic attention, [124-125] discomposure and composure; [126-126 friendship with the bad and the good; [128-129] devotion to bad things and to good things;

[130-131] Those monks who teach not-Dhammal as Dhamma, ot Dhamma as not-Dhamma, bring loss to themsleves to ordinary folk and to devas; and they cause the disappearamceof the true Dhamma.
[132-133] The same as the above but with reference to Vinaya as non-Vinaya and the opposite.
[134-135]The same as the above but with reference to uttered by the Tathāgata sas not uttered by him, and the opposite.
[136-137] The same as the above but with reference to something not proclaimed by the Tathāgata as being proclaimed by him and the opposite.
[138-139]The same as the above but with reference to something not practiced by the Tathāgata as being practiced by him and the opposite.

11. Adhammavagga – 11. Chapter on Not-Dhamma

[140-149] Same as suttas [131-139] except that in each case it is said that it is a loss misery and injury of many folk and to devas and mankind. Moreover, it begets great demerit and cause the disappearance of the true Dhamma.

12 Anāpattivagga – 12. Chapter on Unpardonable Offenses

[150-159] These 10 suttas deal with offenses which bring harm and suffering to those who do them as well as to others and gods. The are: making an offence into a on- offence; not regarding an offence as an offence; making a small offence into a big one; a big one into a small one; not recognising a chastity offence; making a chastity offencew; making a patial offence into a complete one; make a complete offence into a partial one; making a partial one into a compete one; a pardonable one into a non-pardonable one; and vice versa.
[160-169] These are the contrary of the previous ten suttas.

13. Ekapuggalavagga – 13. Chapter on the One Person

[170-174] The one thing is the Tathāgata. He is extra ordinary. His death is regretted by all. He is unique and has no peer.
[175-187] Further praise of the Tathāgata. In one person he manifests the mighty eye, a mighty radiance. He manifests the four branches of logical analysis, penetrates the diverse elements, realizes the fruits of knowledge and release. He surpasses the stream winner, the once-returner and the non-returner, and is an Arahant. He sets rolling the wheel of Dhamma as does the venerable Sāriputta.

14. Etadaggavagga – 14. Chapter on the Prominent Ones

Part One: [188-197] These relate to the chief disciples of the Buddha. Mentioned are Kondañña, Sāriputta, Mahā Moggallāna, Mahā Kassapa, Anuruddha, Bhaddiya Kiligodhaputta, Bhaddiya (the dwarf), Bharadvāja, Puñña Mantaniputta and Mahā Kaccana.
Part Two: [198-208] These relate to monk disciples who have developed their mental powers. Chief among them is Cūḷapantaka. Others mentioned are: Mahā Pantaka, Subūti, Revaka Khadiravaniya, Kanṅkhā-revata, Upasena, Soṇa the Koliyan, Soṇa Kuṭikaṇṇa, Sīvali and Vakkali.
Part Three: [209-218] These have excelled in various aspects. They include Rāhula, Raṭṭhapāla, Kuṇḍadāna, Vaṅgīsa, Upasena, Nandaka, Dabba, Pilindavacca, Bāhiya Dārucīriya, Kumārkassapa, and Mahā Koṭṭhita.
Part Four: [219-234] these are learned disciples. They include Ananda, Uruvela Kassapa, Kāludāyi, Bakkula, Sibhita, Upāli, Nandaka, Nanda, Mahā Kappina, Rādha, and Mogharājāti.
Part Five: [235-247] Bhikkhuni's include: Mahā Pajāpatigotamī, Khemā, Uppalavaṇṇā , Paṭācārā, Dhammadinnā, Nandā, Soṇā , Bakulā, Kuṇḍalakesā,Bhaddā Kāpilāni, Bhaddakaccānā, Kisāgotamī, and Siṅgālakamātā.
Part Six: [248-257] Men lay followers include: apassu and Bhalluka, Sudatta (Anathapiṇḍika, Citta, Macchikāsaṇḍika, Hatthaka, Mahānāma the Sakyan, Ugga, Uggata, Surambaṭṭhika, Jvaka Komārabacca, and Nakulapitar.

Part Seven: [258-267] Women lay followers include: Sujātā, Visākhā Migāramātā, Khujjuttarā, Sāmāvatī. Uttarānandāmātā, Suppavāsā, Suppiyā, Kātiyānī, Nakulamātā, and Kāḷī.

15. Aṭṭhānapāḷi – 15. Chapter on the Impossible

[268-278] First section. It is impossible for a person of right view to do the following: to make anything permanent, happy, or as self; to kill his mother, his father, an Arahant, shed the blood of a Tathāgata; cause a schism in the Order; or proclaim some other teacher. It is impossible for there to be two fully enlightened persons or two universal monarchs in the same world system.


[279-286] Second section. It is impossible for these things to happen: A woman to be a fully enlightened Arahant, or a Sakka, or a Māra, or a Brahmā; or an evil deed done by body, speech or thought to be pleasant; or a good deed to be unpleasant; or a person addicted to evil deeds to go to heaven; ot a person addicted to good deeds to go hell.

[287-295] Third section. It is impossible for these things to happen: A person addicted to good bodily verbal or mental conduct to get unpleasant hateful and distasteful results; a person given to bad bodily verbal and mental conduct to go to heaven after death; a person given to good bodily verbal and mental conduct too go to hell will after death.

16. Ekadhammapāḷi – 16. Chapter on the One Thing

[296-297] First section. The one thing that leads to disenchantment, to dispassion, to cessation, to peace, to direct knowledge, to enlightenment, and to nibbāna the recollection of Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha.

[298-307] Second section. These ten suttas state: that wrong view leads to unwholesome things; that right view leads to wholesome things; that with wrong view no wholesome things can arise; that with right view wholesome things can arise; that with careless attention wrong views arise; that with careful attention right views arise; that wrong view leads to bad destinations like hell; that right view leads to good destinations like heaven; that with wrong view kammas done lead to undesirable fruit; that with right view kammas done lead to desirable fruit.

[308-321] Third section. These ten suttas state: that a person with wrong view arises for the detriment of all; that a person with right view arises for the good of all; that wrong view is the most blame worthy thing; that Makkkhsli isd a hollow man; that he who expounds Dhamma badly gets much demerit; that he who expounds Dhamma wells gets much merit; that expounding Dhamma badly leads to much suffering; that one lazy in Dhamma though well expounded dwells in suffering.

[322-365] Fourth section: In Jambudvipa delightful places are few rough places are many just so few beings are born on land and more in the water; so too few are are born among humans and more among non humans; so too few are born in the Middle Provinces (of Jambudvipa) and more elsewhere; so too few are the wise more numerous are the foolish; so too few are those who get to see the Tathāgata and more who do not; so too few are those who hear the Dhamma from the Tatāgata and more who do not; so too few are those who examine the teaching and more those who do not; so too few are those who are urgent in inspiring things and more that are not; so too few are those who concentrate on one-pointedness of mind and more who do not; so too few are those who get good food and more who do not; so too few are those who get the taste of the Dhamma and more who do not; so too few are those who after death are reborn as humans and more who do not; so too few are those who are reborn as devas and more who do not and are reborn in hell or as animals or ghosts; so too are few who leaving the deva world are reborn as humans and more who are not; so too few are those who leaving hell are reborn as humans and more who are not and are reborn as animals, ghosts or again in hell; so too few are those who leaving ghostly birth are reborn as humans and more who are not.

17. Pasādakarmadhamaavagga – 17. Chapter on factors promoting gain

[366-381] Factors promoting gain (for monks) are: being a forest-dweller, relying on alms ood, wearing robes, having just three robes, speaking on Dhamma, upholding the discipline, having great learning, having proper deportment, acquiring a retinue, a large retinue, coming from a good family, being handsome, being an excellent speaker, having few desires, and having good health.

18. Aparacchrāsaṅgātavagga – 18. Chapter on the finger-snap

[382 - 442] A monk doing the following things even just for one finger-snap is one not without jhana, is one who acts according to the Teacher, who responds to his advice, and who does not eat the country's alms-food in vain. The things are: develop the first, second, third, and fourth jhānas; liberates the mind by loving kindness, compassion, altruistic joy and equanimity; generates desire, effort, energy and mind application for the non-arising or abandoning of unwholesome qualities; generates desire, effort, energy and mind application for the arising or maintenance of wholesome qualities; generates desire, effort, energy, and mind application for the non-arising or abandoning of bad unwholesome qualities; generates desire, effort, energy, and mind application for the arising and maintenance wholesome qualities; develops psychic power from concentration due to desire, energies, and activities of striving; develops psychic power from concentration due to mind, invesigaton and and activities of striving; develops the power of faith; develops the power of energy; develops the power of mindfulness; develops the power of concentration; develops the power of wisdom; develops the earth-water-fire-air-blue-yellow-red-white -space-consciousness kasina; develops the perception of unattractiveness-death-repulsiveness (of food)-non-delight (of the world)-impermanence-suffering (of the impermanent)-nonself (in suffering)-abandoning;-dispassion-cessation- impermanance-nonself-death-repulsiveness (of food)-nondelight (of world)-skeleton-corpse (with worms, livid, fissured, bloated); develops recollection of the Buddha-Dhamma-Sangha-virtuous (behavior)-generosity-deities; develops mindfulness of breathing-death-body; develops recollection of peace; develops the faculty of faith-energy-mindfulness-concentration-wisdom; develops the power of faith-energy-mindfulness-concentration-wisdom.

[443 - 492] A monk doing the following things even just for one finger-snap is one not without jhana, is one who acts according to the Teacher, who responds to his advice, and who does not eat the country's alms-food in vain. The things are: develops the earth-water-fire-air-blue-yellow-red-white-space-consciousness kasina; develops the perception of unattractiveness-death-repulsiveness (of food)-non-delight (of the world)-impermanence-suffering (of the impermanent)-nonself (in suffering)-abandoning-dispassion-cessation-impermanance-nonself-death-repulsiveness (of food)-nondelight (of world)-skeleton-corpse (with worms, livid, fissured, bloated); develops recollection of the Buddha-Dhamma-Sangha-virtuous (behavior)-generosity-deities; develops mindfulness of breathing-death-body; develops recollection of peace; develops the faculty of faith-energy-mindfulness-concentration-wisdom; develops the power of faith-energy-mindfulness-concentration-wisdom.

[493-56t2] A monk doing the following things even just for one finger-snap is one not without jhana, is one who acts according to the Teacher, who responds to his advice, and who does not eat the country's alms-food in vain. The things are: develops the faculty of faith and the power of wisdom accompanied by the second, third and fourth jhāna; develops the faculty of faith accompanied by loving kindness; develops the faculty of energy; develops the faculty of mindfulness; develops the faculty of concentration; develops the faculty of wisdom; develops the power of faith; develops the power of energy; develops the power of mindfulness; develops the power of concentration; develops the power of wisdom accompanied by loving-kindness; develops the faculty of faith; develops the power of wisdom accompanied by compassion; develops the faculty of faith and the power of wisdom accompanied by altruistic joy; develops the faculty of faith and the power of wisdom accompanied by equanimity.

19. Kāyagatāsativagga – 19. Chapter on Mindfulness directed to the Body

[563-574] Just as the ocean includes all streams that run into it so mindfulness of the body includes all wholesome qualities. Cultivation of this mindfulness (of the body) leads to a strong sense of urgency, great good, security from bondage, clear comprehension, attainment of knowledge and vision, pleasant dwelling here and now and the realization of the fruit of knowledge and liberation. It makes the body and mind tranquil, and makes all wholesome qualities that pertain to true knowledge to reach fulfilment. Wholesome qualities arise and expand while the opposite happens to unwholesome qualities.
[575 - 583] Cultivation of mindfulness of the body leads to differentiation by wisdom and nibbāna through non-clinging. It penetrates the diversity of elements and leads to analytical knowledge of them. It leads to the realization of the fruit of stream entry, to the realization of the fruit of once-returning, to the realization of the fruit of non-reluming, to the realization of the fruit of arahantship.
[584-599] Mindfulness of the body is the one thing that leads to wisdom, to its growth, expansion, greatness, diversity, vastness, depth, unsurpassed breadth, abundance, rapidity, buoyancy, joyesness, swiftness, keenness and penetrativeness .

20. Amatavagga – 20. Chapter on the Deathless

[600-611] They do not enjoy the deathless who do not enjoy mindfulness regarding the body. They enjoy the deathless who enjoy mindfulness directed to the body. Similar statements between deathlessness and mindfulness about the body are made with respect to those who have fallen away from the deathless, those who have neglected the deathless, those who have been heedless about the deathless, those who have forgotten the deathless, those who have not pursued the deathless, those who have not developed the deathless, those who have not cultivated the deathless, those who have not directly known the deathless, those who have not fully understood the deathless, and finally those who have not realized the deathless.