23. Rādhasaṃyutta – Sayings about Rādha

I Patamavagga – First section

[160] 1. Māra. (Mārasutta). At Sāvatthi. Venerable Rādha came to the Buddha and asked: "They say 'Māra'. Where is Māra?". The Buddha then gave this sequence: "The body is to be regarded as (of the nature of) Māra; it is perishable, smelly, painful like an arrow and should be regarded with disgust which leads to dispassion. This is necessary to get release in Nibbāna". When Rādha asked what is Nibbāna the Buddha said that he was asking too much, and that he would not understand it. Nibbāna is the final goal of the holy life. What was said about the body also applies to feeling, perception, the activities and consciousness.

[161] 2. A being. (Sattasutta). As in the previous sutta venerable Rādha asks the Buddha: "How far is once called a being". The Buddha said: "When a body is entangled with craving and lust then is one a being. So also when feeling, perception, activities and consciousness is entangled with craving and lust. Little children build and play with sandcastles through desire, but when desire ends they kock down the sandcastles. Similarly you should end lust and craving for body, feeling, perception, activities and consciousness. The destruction of craving is Nibbāna".

[162] 3. Net of becoming. (Bhavanettisutta). As in the previous suttas venerable Rādha asks the Buddha: "What is the net of becoming". The Buddha answered: "The mental craving and grasping after systems and dogmas about body (and the other four factors) is the net of becoming, When these cease so does the net of becoming.

[163] 4. What is to be understood. (Pariññeyyasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed Venerable Rādha: "I will tell you the things to be understood, and the person who has understood them. The body (and the other four factors) are things to be understood. Understanding them is the destruction of lust, hatred and delusion. The monk who has done that is the person who has understood".

[164] 5. Recluses. (Samaṇasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed Venerable Rādha: "The five groups of grasping are the grasping after body, feeling, perception, activities and consciousness. Those who do not understand the true nature of these graspings are not recluses or brahmins. Those who do are approved amongst recluses amd brahmins. They have realized the fruit of recluseship and brahminhood.

[165] 6. Recluses (2). (Dutiyasamaṇasutta). [Same as the previous sutta emphasisign the happening rather than the undertanding.]

[166] 7. Streamwinner. (Sotāpanna). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed Venerable Rādha: "When the Ariyan disciple understands the happening and the ceasing of the five groups of grasping he is called a streamwinner, bound for enlightenment".

[167] 8. The Arahant. (Arahantasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed Venerable Rādha: "When a monk sees the happening, the ceasing, the satisfaction, the misery, and the escape from the five groups of grasping, and has destroyed the intoxicants (āsava) he is called an Arahant".

[168] 9. Desire and lust. (Chandarāgasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed Venerable Rādha: "Put away the desire, lust, temptation and craving for the body, feeling, perception, activities and consciousness, so that they can never rise again".

[169] 10. Desire and lust (2) (Dutiyachandarāgasutta). [Same as previous sutta with 'grasping after systems and mental bias' added after 'craving']

II Dutiyavagga – Second section

[170] 11. Māra. (Mārasutta). At Sāvatthi. Venerable Rādha asks the Buddha: "What is 'Māra'?". The Buddha said: "The body is Māra; so is feeling, perception, activities and consciousness. The Ariyan disciple feels aversion for them and knows 'in these conditions there is no hereafter'".

[171] 12. Law of Māra. (Māradhammasutta). [The same as the previous sutta with 'Māra' replaced by 'Law of Māra'.] br>
[172] 13. Impermanance? (Aniccasutta). Venerable Rādha asks the Buddha: "What is Impermanence?". The Buddha answered: "The body (and the other four factors) are impermanent. He who knows and sees this there is no hereafter.

[173] 14. Law of impermanence. (Aniccadhammasutta). [Same as previous sutta with 'law of impermanence' replacing 'impermanence'.]

[174] 15. Suffering. (Dukkhasutta). [Same as sutta 13 with 'suffering' replacing 'impermanence'.]

[175] 16. Law of suffering.16. (Dukkhadhammasutta). [Same as sutta 14 with 'law of suffering' replacing 'law of impermanence'.]

[176] 17. No self (Anattasutta). [Same as sutta 13 with 'no soul' replacing 'impermanence'.]

[177] 18. Law of no self. (Anattadhammasutta). [Same as sutta 14 with 'law of no soul' replacing 'law of impermanence'.]

[178] 19. Law of Perishing. (Khayadammasutta). [Same as sutta 14 with 'law of perishing' replacing 'law of impermanence'.]

[179] 20. Law of ageing (Vayadhmmasutta). [Same as sutta 14 with 'law of ageing' replacing 'law of impermanence'.]

[180] 21. Law of happening. (Samudayadhammasutta). [Same as sutta 14 with 'law of happening' replacing 'law of impermanence'.]

[181] 22. Law of ceasing. (Nirodhadhammasutta). [Same as sutta 14 with 'law of ceasing' replacing 'law of impermanence'.]

III Āyācanavagga – Section on Requesting

[This section contains 11 suttas which are repetitions of earlier suttas in this Samyutta (collection) with the same name but with small changes. These are as follows: ]

[182] 23. Mara. (Mārasutta) = Sutta 11.
[183] 24. Law of Mara (Mādhammasutta) = Sutta 12.
[184] 25. Impermanence. (Aniccasutta) = Sutta 13.
[185] 26. Law of impermanence. (Aniccadhammasutta) = Sutta 14.
[186] 27. Suffering. (Dukkhasutta) = Sutta 15.
[187] 28.Law of suffering. (Dukkhadhammasutta) = Sutta 16.
[188] 29. No soul. (Anattasutta) = Sutta 17.
[189] 30. Law of no soul. (Anattadhammasutta) = Sutta 18.
[190] 31. Law of destruction. (khayadhammasutta) = Sutta 19.
[191] 32. Law of change. (vayadhammasutta) = Sutta 20.
[192] 33. Law of Happening. (Samudayadhammasutta) = Sutta 21.
[193] 34. Law of ceasing (Nirodhadhammasutta) = Sutta 22.

IV Upanisinnavagga – Section on Secret Teraching

[This section contains 11 suttas which are repetitions of earlier suttas in this Samyutta (collection) with the same name but with small changes. These are as follows: ]

[194] 35. Mara. (Mārasutta) = Sutta 11.
[195] 36. Law of Mara (Mādhammasutta) = Sutta 12.
[196] 37. Impermanence. (Aniccasutta) = Sutta 13.
[197] 38. Law of impermanence. (Aniccadhammasutta) = Sutta 14.
[198] 39. Suffering. (Dukkhasutta) = Sutta 15.
[199] 40.Law of suffering. (Dukkhadhammasutta) = Sutta 16.
[200] 41. No soul. (Anattasutta) = Sutta 17.
[201] 42. Law of no soul. (Anattadhammasutta) = Sutta 18.
[202] 43. Law of destruction. (khayadhammasutta) = Sutta 19.
[203] 44. Law of change. (vayadhammasutta) = Sutta 20.
[204] 45. Law of Happening. (Samudayadhammasutta) = Sutta 21.
[205] 46. Law of ceasing (Nirodhadhammasutta) = Sutta 22.

24. Diṭṭhisaṃyutta – Sayings on Views

1. Sotāpatthivagga – Section on the Stream winner

[206] 1. Wind. (Vātasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "There is a view which states: 'Winds do not blow, rivers do not flow, pregnant women do not give birth, the moon and sun are stable neither rising nor setting'". He then said that such a view arises due to clinging to body, feeling, perception, activities and consciousness". The Buddha then made the monks admit that the body is impermanent, sorrowful, and changeable. They then admitted that because of this the  view given arises. The Buddha concluded that when the Ariyan disciple has put away doubt relating to these points he also puts away doubt relating to suffering, its arising, its ceasing and the way to its ceasing. He then becomes a stream winner.

. [207] 2. This is mine. (Etaṃmamasutta). [Here the view considered is : "This is mine, this am I, this is the self of me". This view is considered in the same way as the view given in sutta 1 on the wind (Vātasutta).]

[208] 3. This is the self . (Attasutta). [Here the view considered is : "This is the self". This view is considered in the same way as the view given in sutta 1 on the wind (Vātasutta).]

[209] 4. It may not be mine. (Nocamesiy&,#257;). [Here the view considered is : "I may not be, and mine it may not be. I shall not be, and mine it shall not be". This view is considered in the same way as the view in sutta 1 on the wind (Vātasutta).]

[210] 5. There is nothing given. (Natthidinnasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha said that there is a view which says: "There is no alms-giving, no sacrifice. There is no result of good or evil deeds. There is neither this world nor the world beyond. There is no mother or father, no gods, no recluses and brahmins who have won perfection and proclaim it. A man is made of the four elements and on death hi10s body disperses back into the four elements". Then the Buddha said that this view arises by being a body, clinging to it and depending on it. The same applies to the other four factors from feeling to consciousness. But the Ariyan disciple who has put away doubt about these points has no doubt about suffering, its arising, its ceasing, and the way to its ceasing. He is called "stream-winner", saved from disaster, and bound for enlightenment.

[211] 6. The person who acts. (Karatosutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha said that there is a view which says: "For him who mutilates or torments or causes grief or enfeebles or binds or takes life or robs or commits adultery or tells lies, or makes other do so ̵ by one so acting no evil is done. Even if he kiills all living beings or all those in the right bank of the Ganges no evil will comme to him. If he should go along the left bank of the Ganges, making offerings or sacrifices, yet no merit will accrue to him". [The rest of the sutta follows the pattern of Sutta 1 on the wind (Vātasutta).]

[212] 7. Conditions. (Hetusutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha said that there is a view which says: "There is no condition, or cause for the impurity of beings. They become impure without cause. There is no condition or cause for the purity of beings who become pue withut cause. There is no strength,a no energy, no human effort, no human vigour. All living beings are without power, strength or energy. They are determined by destiny, by coincidence, by nature and are born in one of the six classses of beings". [The rest of the sutta follows the pattern of Sutta 5 (Natthidinnasutta) ending with Ariyan disciple overcoming his doubts and becoming a stream winner.]

[213] 8. The great heresy. (Mahādiṭṭhisutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha said that there is a view which says: "These 7 things (earth, water, fire, air, weal, woe and life) are neither made nor created and are stable and unchanging. They cannot cause each other weal or woe. He who cuts off another's head robs none of life. There are 14,000,000 sorts of birth, 500 karmas, 62 ways of conduct, 62 eras, 6 classes of people, 8 stages of life, 49 ways of living, 4900 kinds of wanderers, 2900 sense faculties, 3000 purgatories. 7 kinds of devas, [etc.]. There are 8,400,000 great periods (mahākappino) of saṃsāric journeying both for the wise and the foolish. One cannot say that all past karma can be extinguished by one penance or holy living. It is useless to say that weal-and-woe of rebirth allotted to one has an end. Both fools and wise alike wander on so far as their weal or woe unwinds." [This view is treated in the same way as the view on 'Wind' given sutta 1 (Vātasutta)].

[The next 10 suttas (9 - 18) follow the same pattern of the view on 'Wind' given sutta 1 (Vātasutta). Accordingly in the abstract on these sutttas only the view is given. The view is explained as being due to the five aggregates clinging (from body to consciousness).].
[214] 9. Sassasadiṭṭhisutta. "The world is eternal."
[215] 10. Asassasadiṭṭhisuttasutta. "The world is not eternal."
[216] 11. Antavāsutta. "The world is limited."
[217] 12. Anantavāsutta. "The world is unlimited."
[218] 13. Taṃsarīraṃsutta. "The life is what body is."
[219] 14. Aññaṃjīvaṃaññaṃsarīrasutta. "Life is one thing body is another."
[220] 15. Hotitathāgatosutta. "The Tathāgata exists after death."
[221] 16. Nahotitathāgatosutta. "The Tathāgata does not exist after death."
[222] 17. Hotitanacahotitatatāgatosutta. "The Tathāgata both exists and does not exist after death" .
[223] 18. Nevahotinanahotitathāgatosutta). "Neither does the Tathāgata exist nor does he not exist after death".

2 Dutiyagamanavagga – Second Repetition

[224-241] 1. Winds - 18.Vātasutta - Nevahotinanahotitathāgatosutta). [These suttas are a repetition of suttas 1 -18 given above.]
[242] 19. The self has formRūpīattāsutta. "The self has form; it is without sickness after death." [This view quoted by the Buddha is held by a group of wanderers. It is refuted in the same way as the view relating to the view "Winds do not blow" in sutta 1 (Vātasutta. The same applies to the following suttas up to sutta 26.]
[243] 20. The self is formless.Arūpīattāsutta. "The self is formless; it is without sickness after death."
[244] 21. Self has both form and is formless.Rūpīcaarūpīcaattāsutta. "The Self has both form and is formless after death."
[245] 22. Self has neither form nor is it formless.Nevarūpīnaārūpīattāsutta. "Self has both form and is formless after death."
[246] 23. Complete blissEkantasukhīsutta. "The self has sheer bliss without sickness after death."
[247] 24. Complete sufferingEkamtadukkhīsutta. "The self is in complete suffering without sickness after death."
[248] 25. Self is in bliss and sufering.Sukhadukkhīsutta. "The Self is in bliss and suffering after death."
[249] 26. Self is in bliss without suffering. Adukkhamasukkhīsutta. "The Self is in bliss without suffering after death."

3. Tatiyagamanavagga – Third` Repetition

[250 - 275] . The suttas in this section are the same as those given in the Second Recitation (Suttas 224 - 249).

4. Cutthagamanavagga – Fourth Repetition

[276 - 301] . The suttas in this section are the same as those given in the Third Recitation (Suttas 250 - 275).

25. Okkhantasaṃyutta – Sayings about Entering

[302] 1. The Eye. Cakkhusutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The eye is impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So are the ear, the nose, the tongue, the body, and the mind. One who realized this on the basis of faith is a walker in faith (saddhānusārī) one who is assured of worthiness and perfection (when reborn) and would not be born in purgatory or as an animal or hungry ghost or in a state incapable of being a stream-winner. But if he acepts these out of insight he becomes a stream winner and is assured of these things (in this life itself)".

[303] 2. Body. Rūpasutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The body is impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So are sounds and scents, tastes and tangibles, and states of mind. [The same consequences result as in the previous sutta for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[304] 3. Conciousness. Viññāṇasutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Eye-consciousness is impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So also is ear-, nose-, tongue-, body-, mind-consciousness". [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[305] 4. Contact- Samphassasutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Eye-contact is impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So also is ear-, nose-, tongue-, body-, mind-contact". [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[306] 5. Feeling. Sampassajāsutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Feelings that arise from eye-contact are impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So also are feelings that arise from ear-, nose-, tongue-, body-, mind-contact". [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[307] 6. Perception. Rūpasaññāsutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Perception of body js impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So is perception of sound, scent, taste, touch, ideas". [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[308] 7. Volition. R[63;pasañcetanāsutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Bodily volitional acts are impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So are those occasioned by sound, scent, taste, touch, and by ideas. [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[309] 8. Craving. Rūpataṇhāsutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Craving for body is impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So is craving for sounds, scents, savours, taouches, and ideas". [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[310] 9. Earth-element. Pathavīdhātusutta. "The Earth-element is impermanent, changeable, becoming otherwise. So are the elements of water, heat, air, space and consciousnes". [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

[311] 10. The Five Aggregates. Khandasutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The body aggregate is impermanent. So are the aggregates of feeling, perception, activities and conciousness". [The same consequences result as in sutta 1 for one who accepts this on faith and for one doing so out of insight.]

26. Uppādasaṃyutta – Sayings about Origination (Genesis)

[312] 1. Eye. Chakkusutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The arising, establishing, completing and appearing of eye (cakkhussa uppādo ṭhiti abhinibbatti pātubhāvo), leads to the arising [etc.] of suffering, disease, and decay-and-death. So also do the arising [etc] of ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. The ending (nirodo) of the eye and the other organs lead to the ending of suffering, disease, and decay-and-death". [The translation of abhinibbatti as 'rebirth' as is sometimes done is questionable.]

[313] 2. Material formRūpasutta. [Same as sutta 1 except that eye (chkkhui) is replaced by 'material form' rūpa, and 'ear, nose, tongue , body and mind' is replaced by 'sounds, scents, savours, tangibles, and ideas'.

[314] 3. Consciousness. Viññāṇasutta. [Same as sutta 1 except that the arising of the eye is followed by the arising of mind-consciousness (manoiviññāṇa) and the ceasing of eye consciousness is followed by the ceasing of mind consciousness. Rest is the same.]

[315] 4. Contact. ṣampassasutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The arising of eye contact and of mind contact leads to the arising [etc.] of suffering, disease, and decay-and-death. The ending (nirodo) of the eye contact and of mind contact lead to the ending of suffering, disease, and decay-and-death".

[316] 5. Feeling. Sampassajasutta. [The same as the previous sutta except that the arising of suffering is attributed to feeling born of the eye contact and mind contact. Ceasing of suffering is also due to the ceasing of feeling due to ceasing of eye and mind contact.]

[317] 6. Perception. Saññāsutta. [The same as the previous sutta except that 'feeling' is replaced by 'perception'. ]

[318] 7. Volition. Sañcetanāsutta. [Here the appearance of suffering [etc.] is attributed to the arising of volitional acts through body and mind. So also is their ceasing.]

l[319] 8. Craving. sutta. [Here the appearance of suffering [etc.] is attributed to the arising of craving for body and things. So also is their ceasing.]

[320] 9. Earth element. Dhātusutta. [Here the appearance of suffering [etc.] is attributed to the arising of the basic elements of earth, air, water, space, and consciousness. By the ceasing of these is the end of suffering [etc] occurs.

[321] 10. The Five Aggregates. Khandasutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The arising, establishing, completion, and the appearing of the body aggregate, is the arising of suffering, disease and decay-and-death. So also is the other four aggregates of feeling, of perception, of the activities and of consciousness. The ceasing, the calming, and the ending of these five aggregates is the ceasing of suffering, disease, and the ending of decay-and-death."

27. Kilesasaṃyutta – Sayings about Corruptions

[322] 1. The eye. Cakkhusutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Lustful desire chandarāga in the eye is a corruption of the mind (citta). So is it when it is also in the ear, nose, tongue, body, and consciousness. When a monk has put away these corruptions from his mind it is filled with renunciation (nekkhamma) and ready to receive those things to be realized.

[323] 2. Material form. Rūpasutta. [Same as sutta 1 replacing 'eye' with 'material form' and 'ear, nose, tongue, body, and consciousness (manaseso)' with 'sounds, scents, savours, tangibles and thoughts'.

[324] 3. Consciousness. sutta. At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "Desire-and-lust which is in eye-consciousness, ear-consciousness, nose-consciousness, tongue-consciousness, body-consciousness and mind-consciousness are corruptions of the mind. When these are put away the monk is filled with renunciation [etc. as in sutta 1]".

[325] 4. Contact. Samphassasutta. [As in the previous sutta but with 'consciousness' replaced with 'contact'. ]

[326] 5. Feeling. Sampassajasutta. [As in the sutta 3 but with 'consciousness' replaced with 'feeling'. ]

[327] 6. Perception. Saññāsutta. [As in the sutta 3 but with 'consciousness' replaced with 'perception'. ]

[328] 7. Volition. Sañcetnāsutta. The Buddha tells the monks that the mind is corrupted by volition (or will) relating to visible shape, sound, scent, savour, tangibles and things (dhammā). When these corruptions are put away the monk is in renunciation (as in sutta 1).]

[329] 8. Craving. Taṇhāsutta. The Buddha tells the monks that the mind is corrupted by craving relating to visible shape, sound, scent, savour, tangibles and things (dhammā). When this corruption is put away the monk is in renunciation (as in sutta 1).]

[330] 9. Earth element. Dhātusutta. The Buddha tells the monks that the mind is corrupted by lustful desire for earth, water, heat, air, space and consciousness. When this corruption is put away the monk is in renunciation [(as in sutta 1).]

[331] 10. The Five Aggregates. Khandasutta. The Buddha tells the monks that the mind is corrupted by lustful desire for the five aggregates of body, feeling, perception, activities and consciousness. When these are put away the monk is in renunciation [(as in sutta 1)].

28. Sāriputtasaṃyutta – Sayings about Sāriputta

[332] 1. Solitude. Vivekajasutta. Once in Sāvatthi venerable Ananda saw venerable Sāriputta with his features clear and his face clear and translucent. When asked why this was so Sāriputta replied: " I have been dwelling in the forest away from things of passion and evil, with thought applied and sustained and full of zest and happiness. This was the First Jhana even though I did not consider that it was I who had attained it". Ananda agreed that this was because Sāriputta for a long time had given up leanings to I-making, to mine-making and had well rooted out vanity.

[333] 2. Applied thought. Avitakkasutta. This time venerable Ananda encountered venerable Sāriputta in the same state and enquired why this was so. Sāriputta replied "I have calmed applied and sustained thought with single-mindedness of will and attained to the Second Jhana, that is born of mental balance, full of zest and happiness". Yet he felt that it was not he who had attained this. Ananda made the same reply as in the previous sutta.

[334] 3. Zest. Pītisutta. This time Sāriputta replied to Ananda's question: "From the fading away of zest, I have attained to the Third Jhana, disinterested, mindful and self-possessed, well aware in the body". The sutta concludes as in the previous sutta.

[335] 4. Equnimity. Upekkhāsutta. This time Sāriputta replied to Ananda's question: "Putting away weal and woe, by the ending of both joy and sorrow felt before, I have attained to the Fourth Jhana, a state wherein is neither pleasure nor pain, an equanimity of utter purity". The sutta concludes as in the two previous suttas.

[336] 5. Space. Ākāsānañcāyatanasutta. This time Sāriputta's reply to Ananda's question was: "By passing utterly beyond the consciousness of shape-and-form, by the ending of consciousness of resistance and diversity, I have attained to the sphere of the infinity of space, realizing: 'Infinite is space' ". The sutta concludes as in the three previous suttas.

[337] 6. Conscience. Viññāṇañcāyatanasutta. This time Sāriputta's reply to Ananda's question was: "By passing utterly beyond the sphere of unbounded space, I have attained to the sphere of infinite consciousness, realizing: 'Infinite is consciousness'. The sutta concludes as in the four previous suttas.

[338] 7. Nothingness. Ākiñcaññāyatanasutta. This time Sāriputta's reply to Ananda's question was: "By passing utterly beyond the sphere of infinity of consciousness, I have attained to the sphere of nothingness, realizing: 'There is nothing.' " The sutta concludes as in the five previous suttas.

[339] 8. Neither perception nor non-perception. Nevasaññānāsaññāyatanasutta. This time Sāriputta's reply to Ananda's question was: "By passing utterly beyond the sphere of nothingness, I have attained to the sphere of neither perception nor non-perception". The sutta concludes as in the five previous suttas.

[340] 9. Cessation. 9. Nirodhasamāpattisutta. This time Sāriputta's reply to Ananda's question was: "By passing utterly beyond the feeling of neither perception nor non-perception, I have attained to the state of cessation of perception and feeling". The sutta concludes as in the six previous suttas.

[341] 10. Sister Sūcimukhī Sūcimukhīsutta. Once when Sāriputta was resting after his mid-day meal at the Veluvana in Rajagaha the wandering sister Sūcimukhī approached him and asked: "Do you eat looking downwards, or upwards, or the four quarters, or points between them"? The Buddha said "No" to all of them. When questioned further he said that wanderers are said to adopt these eating postures if they practice wrong ways like star-gazing, or divination or palmistry, or doing errands, and similar. He seeks his food rightly and eats it rightly. Then Sūcimukhī went round the streets of the city informing householders of this and advising them to give food to the sons of the Sakyan. [This saṃyutta gives the classic sequence of nine attainments that the Ariyan disciple has to go through to realize his final liberation. The last one not mentioned is the destructions of the āsavas (intoxicants). These attainments are described as elsewhere in the broadest of terms.]

[There are six more saṃyuttas Nos 29 - 34) left in the Khandavagga of the Saṃyutta Nikāya. The first four deal with non-human subjects and the last two on Vaccagotta and on Jhanas. They contain many suttas with many repetitions. The individual suttas will not be identified and the substance of each saṃyutta will be abstracted as a whole. ]

29. Nagasaṃyutta – Sayings about Nāgas

     There are four kinds of Nāgas (snakes), the egg-born, the womb-born, the sweat-born and those born without parents. The egg-born are the highest of the Nāgas and a Bhikkhu wanted to know why some of them kept the Uposata observances, The Buddha said that they were egg-born because they did double dealing in a previous birth and wanted a good birth in a heaven next time and so kept the Uposata observances. Later the Buddha told another Bhikkhu that the other kinds of Nāgas also kept the Uposata for the same reason. A person could be born as an egg-born Nāga if he wished it thinking that these Nāgas were long-lived, fair, and happy. Also giving offerings of food, drinks, clothes etc, will also lead to birth as an egg-born Nāga.

30. Suppaṇṇasaṃyutta – Sayings about Suppaṇṇas

     The suppaṇṇa is a mythical bird said to feed on snakes. They are classified into the four ways of birth as the snakes. The egg born suppaṇṇas feed only on the egg born nāgas. The womb born suppaṇṇas feed on egg and womb born nāgas (and so). The reason why these creatures are born as such, and  how they can get out that kind of birth, is explained in the same way as with nāgas in the previous sutta.

31. Gandhabbakāyasaṃyutta – Sayings about Gandharvas

     The gandharvas are a group of gods dwelling on various kinds of fragrances. On being questioned why a person is born as a gandharva the Buddha said that a virtuous person on hearing of the gandharvas wishes to be born as such will be so born. He should be a person making offerings of food, drink, etc.

32. Valāhakasaṃyutta – Sayings about Cloud Spirits

     These are gods in clouds and differ according to the kind of cloud they inhabit. The kinds identified are : cool, hot, thunder. wind, and rain. The birth in any of these kinds of cloud gods depends on the wishes of the aspirant.

33. Vaccagottasaṃyutta – Sayings about Vaccagotta

     Here the wanderer Vacca asks the Buddha questions relating to the world (is it eternal or not, finite or infinite), life (is it the same as the body or different), and the Tathāgata (does he exist after death or not). The Buddha replied that these questions arise by people not undestand the body, feeling, perception, activities, and consciousness. They do not see them or comprehend them, not looking into them and not making them clearā

34. Jhānasaṃyutta – Sayings about Jhanas

   This is a discourse on four kinds of meditators: those skilled in concentration but not in its attainments; those skilled in attainment but not in concentration itself; those not skilled in concentration nor in its attainments; and finally those skilled in both and concentration and attainment. The last is the best. Then attainments are replaced successively by steadfastness and a whole range of other qualities required in meditation.

[This ends the third part (the Khandavagga) of the five parts of the Saṃyutta Nikāya.]