Saṃyutta Nikāya– Book of Kindred Sayings
Saḷāyatanavagga – Section on the Sixfold Sense Base

35. Saḷāyatanasaṃyutta – Sayings on the Sixfold Sense Base

1. Mūlapaññāsa – The first Fifty suttas

1. Aniccavagga – Impermanance

[1] 1. Impermanance (internal) (Ajjhattāniccasutta). Once in Sāvatthi at the Jetavana the Buddha addressed the monks: "The eye is impermanent, What is impermanent is sorrowful and so is void of self (atta). What is void of the self, that is not mine: I am not it: it is not my self. It is the same with the ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. The Ariyan disciple is repelled by these six sense organs and does not lust after them. He knows birth is destroyed, the righteous life is lived, the task has been done, there is no more of this ('Khīṇā jāti, vusitaṃ brahmacariyaṃ, kataṃ karaṇīyaṃ, nāparaṃ itthattāyā')".

[2] 2. Suffering (internal) (Ajjhattadukkhasutta). The same as the previous sutta with "eye is impermanent" replaced by "eye is sorrowful (dukkha)"

[3] 3. The Self is void (internal). (Ajjhattānattasutta). Once in Sāvatthi at the Jetavana the Buddha addressed the monks: "The eye is void of self, so it is not mine: I am not it: it is not my self. [The rest as in sutta 1]".

[4] 4. Impermanent (external). (Bāhirāniccasutta). Once in Sāvatthi at the Jetavana the Buddha addressed the monks: "Material things (Rūpa) are impermanent. What is impermanent, that is suffering, void of self and not mine. Likewise are sounds, scents, savours, things tangible, and mind-states. The Ariyan disciple is repelled by them and does not lust after them. He knows birth is destroyed, the righteous life is lived, the task has been done, there is no more of this."

[5] 5. Suffering (external). (Bāhiradukkhasutta). [Same as previous sutta starting with 'material objects, sounds, scents, savours, things tangible, and mind-states' and continuing to the Aryan disciple].

[6] 6. Void of self (external) (Bāhirānattasutta). [Same as the internal counherpart sutta 3 but replacing the six organs with what they produce like material shapes, sounds, etc.].

[7] 7. Impermanent (internal) (Ajjhattāniccasutta). Once in Sāvatthi at the Jetavana the Buddha addressed the monks: "The eye is impermanent in the past, present and future. So is the ear and the other five organs of sense. The Ariyan disciple cares not for them is repelled by them and seeks dispassion".

[8] 8. Past and future suffering (internal). (Ajjhattadukkhātītānāgatasutta). [The same comments applied in sutta 2 to internal suffering are applied in this sutta to past and future internal suffering.]

[9] 9. Past and future void of self (internal). (Ajjhattānattātītānāgatasutta). [The same comments applied in sutta 3 to internal void of self are applied in this sutta to past and future internal void of self.]

[10] 10. Past and future impermanance (external). (Bāhirāniccātītānāgatasutta). [The same comments applied in sutta 4 to internal impermanance in the present are applied in this sutta to past and future internal impermanence.]

[11] 11. Past and future suffering (external). ( Bāhiradukkhātītānāgatasutta). [The same comments applied in sutta 5 to external suffering in the present are applied in this sutta to past and future internal suffering.]

[12] 12. Past and future void of self (external). (Bāhirānattātītānāgatasutta). [The same comments applied in sutta 6 to external void of self in the present are applied in this sutta to past and future external void of self.]

2. Yamakavagga – The Pairs

[13] 1. Before Enlightenment 1 (Paṭmapubbesambodhisutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "Before my enlightenment I thought: How can I escape from the satisfaction and the misery of the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. I thought that the the satisfaction came from their pleasure, the misery from their impermanence and the escape from denouncing desire and lust for them. Only when I fully understood these did knowledge and insight arise in me and I knew: 'This is release, my last birth and for me no more re-existence (punabbhava)".

[14] 2. Before Enlightenment 2 (Dutiyapubbesambodhisutta). [The same as the above but with eye, ear, etc, replaced by their (external) results as: objects, sounds, scents, savours, tangibles and mind-states.]

[15] 3. Search for satisfaction 1 (Paṭhamaassādapariyesanasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "I then searched for the satisfaction the misery and the way of escape from the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind until I found the answers by right insight. I thoroughly understood as they really are the satisfaction, the misery and the escape from them. Then knowledge and insight arose in me and I knew 'This is release, my last birth and for me no more re-existence' ".

[16] 4. Search for satisfaction 2. (Dutiyaassādapariyesanasutta). [The same as the above but with eye, ear, etc, replaced by their (external) results as: objects, sounds, scents, savours, tangibles and mind-states.]

[17] 5. Without satisfaction 1. ( Paṭhamanoceassādasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "It is only becuse there is satisfaction in the six-fold sense organs do beings lust after them. Only because of the misery attached to them do beings reject them. Only because there is a way of escape do beings seek it. But beings who do not understand the satisfaction, misery and escape from them they remain attached to them. But when they thoruougly understand them they are detached and separated from them".

[18] 6. Without satisfaction 2. (Dutiyanoceassādasutta). [The same as the above but with the six-fold sense organs replaced by their (external) results as: objects, sounds, scents, savours, tangibles and mind-states.]

[19] 7. Taking delight 1. (Paṭhamābhinanandasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "Whosoever takes delight in the six-fold sense organs is not released from them. But he who does no take delight in them is released from them".

[20] 8. Taking delight 2. (Dutiyābhinanandasutta). [The same as the above but with the six-fold sense organs replaced by their (external) results as: objects, sounds, scents, savours, tangibles and mind-states.]

[21] 9. Uprising 1. (Paṭhamadukkhuppādasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "The uprising (uppāda) of the eye, ear, nose tongue, and body is the uprising of suffering, disease and decay-and-death. The ending of these is also the ending of suffering".

[22] 10. Uprising 2. (Duitiyadukkhuppādasutta). [Same as the previous sutta with ear, nose, etc. replaced by objects, sounds, smells, tastes and tangibles.]

3. Sabbavagga – The All

[23] 1. The all. (Sabbasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "The all is eye and object, ear and sound, nose and scent, tongue and savour, body and things tangible, mind and mind-states. If anyone says that he will reject this all and proclaim another all that would he beyond his capacity".

[24] 2. Abandoning 1. (Pahānasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "Ababdoning all means abandoning the eye and its objects, eye conciousness and eye contact as well as the good and bad that results from it. Similarly for the tongue and other organs of sense. That is the abandoning of all.

[25] 3. Abandoning 2. (Abhiññāpariññāpahānasutta). [Samer as the previous sutta except that the ahbandoning must be by 'fully knowing and comprehending' it.]

[26] 4. Comprehension 1. ( Paṭhamaaparijānanasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "Without fully knowing, without comprehending the all, without detaching himself from, without abandoning the all, a man cannot end suffering. By not knowing, comprehending and detachings from all a man is incapable of ending suffering".

[27] 5. Comprehensiohn 2. (Dutiyaparijānanasutta). [Same as previous sutta with the last statement deleted.]

[28] 6. On fire. (sutta). At Gaya near the Gayahead the Buddha said to a large numbr of monks: "All is on fire. The eye, objects, eye conciousness, eye contact, good and bad states experienced are all on fire with the fire of lust, infatuation, birth, decay-and-death, grief lamentation and despair. So also are the other organs of sense." When this was explained in detail the minds of the monks were liberated from the intoxicants (āsavā).

[29] 7. The afflicted. (Addhabhūtasutta). [This is the same as the previous sutta this time given to monks at the Veluvana in Rajagaha.]

[30] 8. Expunging conceits. ( Samugghātasāruppasuttasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "For a bhikkhu the way of uprooting conceits emanating from the eye is to imagine that there is no eye and so that there are no conceits of eye-objects, eye conciousness and eye contact. Similarly for the other organs of sense. Then there is no thought that 'all' is mine. Thus he realizes, 'Birth is destroyed, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. For life in these conditions there is no hereafter' ". Thus are all conceits uprooted.

[31] 9. Help in expunging conceits 1. (Paṭhamasamugghātasappāyasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha adressed the monks: "A bhikkhu has conceit of the eye (and the other organs of sense) and regards it as if it is me or mine therein is instability. The world delights in becoming because it is based on change, because it is entangled in becoming. A Bhikkkhu who has no conceits grasps at nothing in the world. Not grasping he is not troubled. Not being troubled he himself is by himself set free: so that he realizes . . . ' for life in these conditions there is no hereafter.' This is the way helpful for the uprooting of all conceits.

[32] 10. Help in expunging conceits 12 (Dutiyasamugghātasappāyasutta). The Buddha addressed tuhe monks: "I will show you what is of help to destroy all conceits". Using his dialectical method he made them realize that the eye is impermanent, is sorowful and cannot be regarded as me or as mine. So are eye conciousness, eye contact and the self. Seeing this the well taught Ariyan disciple knows: 'Birth is destroyed, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. For life in these conditions there is no hereafter'.

4. Jātidhammavaggavagga – The section on birth.

[33] 1. Birth. (Jātidhammasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "The 'all' is subject to birth – (eye) objects, sounds, scents, savours, tangibles, and mind-states are subject to birth.

[34 - 42] 2. - 10. . [In these nine sutta the term 'birth' is successively replaced by old age (jarā), sickness (byādhi), death (maraṇa), sorrow (soka), impurity (saṃkilesika), dissolution (khaya), growing old (vayadha), uprising (samudaya) and ceasing to be (nirodha).]

5. Sabbaaniccavagga – The section on Impermanance of All.

[43] 1. All is impermanent, Aniccādisutta. In Sāvatthi the Buddha said: "Everything is impermanent. What is everything? The eye, forms (rūpā), eye-consciousness, eye-contact, the good-bad-and-neutral -- all related to the eye; also these related to ear, tongue, body and mind. Then birth is destroyed, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. For life in these conditions there is no hereafter.

[44 - 52] 2. - 10.. [These 9 suttas are as in the previous sutta but with reference successively to: 'The All' (sabbaṃ), the suffering (dukkha), void of self (anattā), to be fully known (abiññeyya), abandoned (pahātabba), realized (saccikātabba), to be comprehended by full knowledge (abhiññāpariññeyya), as oppressed and afflicted (upadduta).

2. Dutiyaapaññāsa – The second Fifty suttas

1. Avijjāvagga – Chapter on Impermanance

[53] 1. Ignorance. (Avijjāpahānasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha was approached by a monk who asked: "How by knowing and seeing does ignorance vanish?". The Buddha answered that when a person sees the eye as impermanent, the objects it reveals, eye consciousness, eye contact and the resulting good, bad and indifferent things as all impermanent then ignorance vanishes. So also for the other organs of sense.

[54] 2. Abandoning fetters (Saṃyojanapahaānasutta). [Same as in sutta 1 with fetters being abandoned.]

[55] 3. Uprooting fetters. (ਐsamugghātasutta). [Same as in sutta 1 with fetters being uprooted.]

[56] 4. Abandoning the intoxicants. (Āsavapahānasutta). [Same as sutta 2 with the intoxicants replacing the fetters.]

[57] 5. Uprooting the intoxicants. (Āsavasamugghātasutta). [Same as sutta 3 with the intoxicants replacing the fetters.]

[58] 6. Abandoning lurking. (Anusayapahānasutta). [Same as sutta 2 with lurking tendency replacing the fetters.]

[59] 7. Uprooting lurking. (Anusayasamugghātasutta). [Same as sutta 3 with lurking tendency replacing the fetters.]

[60] 8. Comprehending attachment. (Sabbupādānapariññāsutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The eye, its objects and its consciousness lead to contact and then to feeling. The Ariyan disciple is repelled by these and does not lust for them and is set free. He realises that he has comprehended attachment. The same applies to the other sense organs".

[61] 9. Exhausting attachment 1. (Paṭhamasabbupādānapariyādānasutta). [The same as sutta 8 replacing comprehending with exhausting.]

[62] 10. Exhausting attachment 2. (Dutiyasabbupādānapariyādānasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "I will show you how to exhaust all attachment". Using his dialectical method he made them realize that the eye is impermanent, is sorrowful and cannot be regarded as me or as mine. So are eye consciousness, eye contact and the self. Seeing this the well taught Ariyan disciple knows: 'Birth is destroyed, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. For life in these conditions there is no hereafter' ".

2. Migajālavagga – Chapter on Migajāla

[63] 1. Migajāla 1. (Paṭhmamigajālasutta). In Sāvatthi venerable Migajāla came to the Buddha and and asked: "When is one dwelling alone and when is one dwelling with another ?" The Buddha replied that a monk is dwelling with another if he is in bondage to the products of the sense organs like objects, sounds, tastes and so, and he is infatuated to them. He is living alone if he is not so infatuated and bonded to objects, sounds, tastes and so on.

[64] 2. Migajāla 2. (Dutiyamigajālasutta). Here Migajāla asks the Buddha to give him a teaching so that he could live alone, diligent, energetic and aspiring (vūpakaṭṭo, appamatto ātāpī pahitatto). The Buddha said: "There are objects cognizable by the eye which are delightful and pleasurable. If a monk clings to them they become a bait to him but they lead to sorrow. But if he is not enamoured of them they do not become a bait. This is the end of the bait, and the fading away of sorrow". Migajāla welcomed these words and departed. Following the Buddha's advice he soon became and arahant.

[65] 3. Samiddhi on Māra 1. (Paṭhamasamiddhimñrapañhāsutta). Once when the Buddha was in the Veluvana in Rājagaha the venerable Samiddhi questioned him on Māra and the things of Māra. The Buddha said: "Where there is the eye and its objects, eye consciousness and what the eye cognizes. Then there is Māra and the things of Māra. So also for the other organs of sense. When there is no eye [and the other sense organs] there is no Māra and no things of Māra.

[66] 4. Samiddhi on beings. (Samiddhiattapañhāsutta). [Here Samiddhi questions the Buddha on a being (atta) and gets the same reply as in the previous sutta.]

[67] 5. Samiddhi on suffering. (Samiddhidukkhapañhāsutta). [Here Samiddhi questions the Buddha on suffering and gets the same reply as in the sutta 3.]

[68] 6. Samiddhi on the world. (Samiddhilokopañhāsutta). [Here Samiddhi questions the Buddha on a suffering (loko) and gets the same reply as in the sutta 3.]

[69] 7. Upasena and the snake poison. (Upasenaāsīvisasutta). Once the venerables Upasena and Sāriputta were staying in a grotto near Rajagaha. Then a snake fell on Upasena's body and bit him. Then Upasena called to the monks to carry him out of the grotto lest he dies there. Then Sāriputta said that he does not see any change in Upasena's body. Upasena replied that he had long given up regarding the body and the other faculties as his own. Then the monks carried him out of the grotto and he succumbed to the snake's poison.

[70] 8. The monk Upavāṇa. (Upavāṇsandiṭṭhikasutta). Once the venerable Upavāṇa came to the Buddha and inquired why the Dhamma was considered as being of immediate use. The Buddha said: "When a monk sees an object with his eye he develops a personal passion for it. Insofar as he is aware of this the Dhamma is of immediate use, apart from time, bidding one come to see, leading on, to be experienced, each for himself, by the wise. It is the same with the other organs of sense".

[71] 9. The sixfold sphere of contact 1. (Paṭhamachaphassāyatanasutta). The Buddha said: "He who does not understand the arising, the destruction, the satisfaction, the misery, and the escape from the sixfold sphere of contact, and has not lived accordingly, is far from this Dhamma and Discipline". A monk then said that he does not understand this. The Buddha then asked him if he considered regarding the eye: "This is mine. This am I. This is my self." On his saying "No" the Buddha said: "Well said. This eye is not mine. This am I not. This is not my self. The eye is rightly seen. That is the end of suffering".

[72] 10. The sixfold sphere of contact 2. (Dutiyachaphassāyatanasutta). [The same as the previous sutta except that the last sentence to the inquiring monk is now: "The eye has been rightly seen by you and has been abandoned and will not come again. So should be the tongue and the mind."]

[73] 11. The sixfold sphere of contact 3. (Tatiyachaphassāyatanasutta). [The same as the two previous suttas except that now impermanence of the eye and the other organs of sense is emphasised.]

3. Gilānavagga – Chapter on The Sick man

[74] 1. The Sick monk 1. (Paṭhamagilānasutta). [In this sutta the Buddha visits a sick monk. He asks the sick monk how he is bearing up. The monk says that he is in great pain. He then asks if the sick monk had kept the moral precepts. The reply was that he had kept them. Then he is asked if he has any doubts. The monk says that he does "not understand the meaning of the purity of life" in the Buddha's Dhamma. Asked how he understands it the monk says that it is "passion and the destruction of passion". The Buddha approves this answer. After this the Buddha makes the monk admit that the eye is impermanent, that it is sorrowful and that it is not proper to regard it as "this is mine, I am this, and this is my self ". Then the Buddha told the monk that the Ariyan disciple is repelled by the sense organs and knows that by living like that there is no hereafter. Hearing these words the Dhamma eye was opened in the sick monk.]

[75] 2. The Sick monk 2. (Dutiya gilānasutta). [This sutta like the previous one is about the Buddha's visit to a sick monk monk. It goes precisely like the previous until the monk gives his understanding of the Dhamma. He says: "The meaning of the Dhamma is final emancipation without grasping". The Buddha approves this and then makes the monk admit that the eye is impermanent, that it is sorrowful and that it is not proper to regard it as "this is mine, I am this, and this is my self ". After listening to the Buddha the monk's mind was liberated from the intoxicants (āsāvā).]

[76] 3. To Rādha on impermanance. (Rādhaaniccasutta). [As in in this sutta the venerable Rādha asks the Buddha to give him a teaching so that he could live alone, diligent, energetic, and aspiring. The Buddha said: "You must abandon desire for the eye, the objects it sees, eye consciousness, and the things good, bad and neutral got by eye contact. The same for tongue, body and mind. Your must abandon desire for all that which is impermanent and lustful".]

[77] 4. To Rādha on suffering. (Rādhadukkhasutta). [The same as the previous sutta with impermanence replaced by suffering. ]

[78] 5. To Rādha on no-self. (Rādhaanattasutta). [The same as the previous sutta with suffering replaced by no self. ]

[79] 6. Ignoance 1. (Paṭhamaavijjāpahānasutta). Once a monk approached the Buddha and asked: "Is there any one one thing which would end ignorance and replace it with knowledge". The Buddha replied: "There is such a thing. This is to know that the eye, the objects it sees, eye consciousness, and the things good, bad and neutral got through eye contact are all impermanent. So also with regard to the tongue and the mind".

[80] 7. Ignorance 2. (Dutiyaavijjāpahānasutta). [In this sutta another monk asks the same question as in the previous sutta. This time the Buddha answers: "If a monk hears that all things ought not to be adhered to he fully understands and comprehends the whole Dhamma. He regards all phenomena as changeable. He regards the eye, its objects [etc] as changeable. So knowing and seeing he abandons ignorance and knowledge arises in him".]

[81] 8. Several bhikkhus. (Sambahulabhikkhusutta). Several Bhikkhus approached the Buddha and said that some wandering sectarians had asked why they lived under the rule of Gatama. They had answered that it is for the full knowledge of suffering. The bhikkhus wanted to know if they had answered correctly. The Buddha said that they had answered correctly and added: "If the wanderers want to know what suffering is they should say: 'Suffering is the eye, the objects it reveals, and the good, bad or indifferent things eye contact reveals' ".

[82] 9. The world. (Lokapañhāsutta). A certain bhikkhu approached the Buddha and asked: "The world, how far does the world go ?". The Buddha answered: "The world gets destroyed. What gets destroyed? The eye, the objects it reveals, and the good, bad or indifferent things that eye contact reveals they all get destroyed".

[83] 10. Phagguna. (Phaggunapañhāsutta). The venerable Phagguna approached the Buddha and asked: "Is there an eye (or other sense organ) by which one can see or cognize past Buddhas, or those who have destroyed the hindrances or those who have cut off craving, ended the round of re-becoming and escaped from all suffering ?" The Buddha replied that there was no such eye or other organ of sense.

4. Channavagga – Chapter on Channa

[84] 1.Liable to destruction. (Palokadhammasutta). In Sāvatthi venerable Ananda asked the Buddha: "How far does the saying 'The world' go?" The Buddha replied: "In the Ariyan discipline the world is that which is liable to destruction. The eye and the objects it sees, the tongue, the mind, mind-states, mind-consciousness, mind-contact, and whatsoever good, bad or indiffernt experienced by mind contact – all these are by nature liable to destruction".

[85] 2. The void world. (Suññatalokasutta). Ananda asks the Buddha: "How far does the saying 'Void is the world' go?" The Buddha replied: "It is so said because the world is void of the self, The eye and the objects it sees, eye-conciousness, eye-contact, mind-contact, and whatsoever good, bad or indiffernt experienced by mind contact – all these are vois of self".

[86] 3. In brief. (Saṃkittadhannasutta). Venerable Ananda asks the Buddha to give him a teaching in brief so that he could live alone, earnest, and aspiring. Using his dialectical method the Buddha made Ananda realize that the eye is impermanent, is sorowful and cannot be regarded as me or as mine. So are eye consciousness, eye contact and the self. Seeing this the well taught Ariyan disciple knows: 'Birth is destroyed, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. For life in these conditions there is no hereafter'.

[87] 4. Channa. (Channasutta). Once the Buddha was staying at the Veluvana in Rajagaha and the venerables Sāriputta, Mahā Cunda and Channa were living at the Gijjakuta. Then Channa was stricken with a serious illness. Then the other two came to Channa and Sāriputta asked how he was bearing. Channa said he was bearing badly with agonising pain in his head and in his abdomen. The pains were increassing and he said he did not want to live any longer and will use the knife (commit suicide), Sāriputta urged him not to do so and to bear up and that he will provide food, medicines and care he may need. Channa said that he was not in need of these things. Then Sāriputts questioned him if he regarded the eye and other sense organs as his own. Channa said that he did not regard them as his, that they were not him and that they were not his self. Then Mahā Cunda told Channa: "Bear in mind the teaching of the Buddha: 'To him that clings there is no wavering. With no clinging and no wavering there is calm. Where there is calm, there is no inclination. Where is no inclination there is no wrong practice. Where is no wrong practice, there is no reappearance, so there is no hereafter". After this advice the two left and Channa committed suicide. [The commentaries state that at the moment of his suicide he realised what he was doing and so gained arahantship.]
       Then Sāriputta informed the Buddha of Channa's suicide and asked what his destiny was as he had relations in a Vajjian village. The Buddha said that there was no blame for Channa for the use of the knife as he was not to be born again. As for his relations they should not be affected as Channa had gone forth from the household life

[88] 5. Puṇṇa. (Puṇṇasutta). The venerable Puṇṇa came to the Buddha and asked for a discourse so that he could live alone, earnest, and aspiring. The Buddha said: "There are passion-fraught lustful objects cognizable by the eye. If a monk is enamoured by them they become a bait which leads to sorrow. So also with sounds, savours, touches and mind states from other organs of sense. If the monk rejects them sorrow will cease".
       Then the Buddha inquired where Puṇṇa intends to go and he said to the region of Sunaparanta. The Buddha said that the men there were fierce and would abuse him and asked what he would then do. He said he would consider the people kind enough not to beat him. He was asked what he would do if he were successively beaten with their hands, clods thrown at him, beaten with sticks, struck with a sword, and finally even stabbed. To the last he said that there were some disciples of the Buddha who had taken the knife (when in pain) and he had come to this but not by his own hand. The Buddha commended him for his self control.He soon left for Sunparanta where in his first rainy season he established 500 devotees in the Dhamma, and himself realized the threefold knowledge before dying. This news was conveyed to the Buddha and when askied what Puṇṇa's rebirth and attainments were he answered that he was a sage (paṇḍta).

[89] 6. Bāhiya. (Bāhiyasutta). The venerable Bāhiya came to the Buddha and asked for a discourse so that he could live alone, earnest, and aspiring. The Buddha questioned Bāhiya dialectically and made him realize that the eye is impermanent, is sorrowful and cannot be regarded as me or as mine. So are eye consciousness, eye contact and the self. Seeing this the well taught Ariyan disciple knows: 'Birth is destroyed, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. For life in these conditions there is no hereafter'.
       Bāhiya then went away and after practicing the Dhamma reached the ultimate goal and became an Arahant.

[90] 7. Passion 1. (Paṭhamaejāsutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Passion is a disease, a bad smell, an arrow. The Tathāgata abides without passion or hurt. To do so one must have no pride in the eye, in its objects, in eye-consciousness, and in good, bad or neutral states arising from eye-contact. He should not think that the eye is mine. So also regarding the ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. He should have no pride of being 'The All' (sabbaṃ) nor think that 'The All' is mine. He should grasp at nothing. Then he realizes destroyed is birth, lived is the holy life, done is the task and there is no hereafter".

[91] 8. Passion 2.(Dutiyaejāsutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Passion is a disease, a bad smell, an arrow. The Tathāgata abides without passion or hurt. To do so one must have no pride in the eye, in its objects, in eye-consciousness, and in good, bad or neutral states arising from eye-contact. He should not think that is mine because therein is instability. The world delights in becoming because it is based on change. So also regarding the ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. There should be no conceit even up to the factors of existence. Having no conceits, one grasps at nothing in the world. One is not troubled and is set free. Then one realizes destroyed is birth, lived is the holy life, done is the task and there is no hereafter".

[92] 9. Duality 1. (Paṭhamadvayasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Eye and object, ear and sound, nose and smell, tongue and taste, body and tangibles, mind and mind-states – these are called duals. Anyone who rejects this saying there is another dual is engaging in idle talk because it would be beyond his scope".

[93] 10. Duality 2. (Dutiyadvaysutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Owing to the dual eye and its objects there arises eye-consciousness. All these three are impermanent and changing. Together they create eye-contact which is also impermanent. Contacted one feels, one is aware and one perceives. These states also are transitory, impermanent and changing. It is also the same with regards to the other duals (ear and sound, etc.)".

5. Saḷavagga – Chapter of the Six

[94] 1. Undisciplined. (Adataaguttasutta). In Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "There are these six sense spheres undisciplined and unprotected, that is the eye, the tongue and the mind". [The other three (ear, nose and body) are mentioned in the long stanza that follows, not abstracted here.]

[95] 2. Mālunkyaputta. (Mālunkyaputtasutta). The old monk venerable Mālunkyaputta asked the Buddha for a short discourse so that he could live alone diligently. The Buddha asked: "If an aged person like you want a short discourse what am I to tell younger monks ?". But Mālunkyaputta insisted and the Buddha said: "Those objects of the senses that you do not now experience do you lust for them ?". The old monk said "No". Then the Buudha said: "So you will relate only to what you have actually seen, heard, or experienced. You would not know the 'thereby' (tena) and so will not know 'therein' (tatta). From this it will follow that you will have no cause for birth here or beyond or in between (nevidha, na huraṃ, na ubhayamantarena). This is the end of suffering". Then Mālunkyaputta expressed his full undertanding of what the Buddha had said in verse repeated by the Buddha himself. After this Mālunkyaputta took leave of the Buddha and practicing ardently in due course became an arahant.

[96] 3. Falling Back. (Parihānadhammasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach you the one who falls back, and six stations of mastery. A monk who sees an evil object and welcomes it is one bound to fall back. But if he rejects it he is bound to succeed. This also applies to tastes and mind states. If on seeing an object with the eye evil states do not arise in a monk he has mastered this sense sphere. Similarly for tongue and mind. These are the six stations of mastery". [Actually only three are mentioned the other three would be for the ear, nose and body.]

[97] 4. Dwelling heedless. (Pamādavihārīsutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach you the monk who dwells heedless. Such a one dwells with the faculty of sight uncontrolled. This leads to corruption of the mind from objects seen; this leads to no delight; this to no joy; this to no clam; and this to sorrow. A sorrowful monk's mind is not composed and it does not lead to clear ideas. Without clear ideas he dwells heedless. The same with regard to the faculties of taste and mind". The opposite sequence is given for the monk who lives in earnest.

[98] 5. Restraint. (Saṃvarasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach you restraint and the lack of it. An unrestrained monk is one enamoured by objects seen by the eye and clings to them. He is one who has fallen back. The same applies to the faculties of the tongue and the mind. A restrained monk is not enamoured of these and does not cling to them".

[99] 6. Concentration. (Samādhisutta). In this sutta the Buddha exhorts monks to practice concentration. A monk doing so knows things as they really are. He knows as impermanent the eye, eye-consciousness, eye-contact as well as the good, bad or indifferent states got through eye-contact. The same applies to the mind and mind-states, mind-consciousness, mind-contact and the states it produces. A monk of concentrated mind knows things as they really are.

[100] 7. Solitude. (Paṭisallānsutta). [The same as the above sutta with concentration replaced by solitude.]

[101] 8.Not yours 1. (Paṭhmanatumhākamsutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Put away that which is not yours for your profit and welfare. Put away the eye and the objects it reveals, eye-consciousness, eye-contact and the good, bad or neutral states experienced by it. So also with the tongue and the mind. Put them away like a man burning rubbish in this Jeta grove".

[102] 9. Not yours 2. (Dutiyatumhākamsutta). [The same as the above sutta without the simile of the Jeta grove. ]

[103] 10. Uddaka. (Udakasutta). The Buddha said: "Uddaka Rāmaputta said: 'All conqueror am I, versed in lore. I have dug out the root of Evil not dug out before'. But he was not versed in lore nor was he an all-conqueror who dug out the root of Evil".
       "A monk is versed in lore when he really understands the arising, destruction, satisfaction, misery and escape from the six sense spheres. He is an all-conqueror when he sees all this and he is freed without grasping from the six sense spheres. To dig out the root of Evil is to see the body made of the four elements as a smelly carcase and to root out craving which is the root of Evil. It is I who is versed in lore, who is an all conqueror and who has dug out the root of Evil".

3. Tatiyapaññāsa – The second Fifty suttas

1. Yogakkhemivagga – Chapter on Winning Security

[104] 1. Winner of security. (Yogakkhemisutta). At Sāvaathi the Buddha addressed the monks: "The Tathāgata has abandoned those objects cognizable by the eye which are pleasant, endearing, fraught with passion so that they will not grow again. This is the abandonment of the yoke. For this he is called the winner of security from the yoke through the Dhamma".

[105] 2. Dependence, (Upādāyasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Personal well-being or suffering occur because of the eye and the mind". Then questioning the monks he made them realize that the eye is impermanent, it leads to suffering, and that personal well-being and suffering cannot arise without dependence on it. And so also with ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. The Ariyan disciple is averse to them and is set free. He realizes: ''Destroyed is birth, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. There is no hereafter'.

[106] 3. The escape from suffering, (Dukkhasamudayasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach the arising and the destruction of suffering. Due to the eye and the eye-objects eye-consiousness arises. These lead to eye-contact which leads to feeling and then to craving. This is the arising of suffering, So also with the other faculties. The ceasing of craving leads to the ceasing of birth. From this the ceasing of ageing sufffering, and and death. So also with the other faculties and the mind.

[107] 4. The escape from the world. (Lokasamudayasutta). [Same as the previous sutta with 'the world' substituted for 'suffering'. ]

[108] 5. "I am better". (Seyyohamasmjisutta). The Budha asked the monks: "According to what comes the notion that 'I am better (or worse or equal)' ? ". He answered this by saying that it was due the eye, the mind and the other sense organs. He then made the monks realize that these were impermanent and leads to suffering, without there there woud be no pleasure or suffering, and there would not be notions of better , worse of equal. The Ariyan disciple is averse to them and is set free. He realizes: ''Destroyed is birth, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. There is no hereafter'.

[109] 6. Fetters. (Saṃyojaniyasutta). [Here the Budddha explains fetters in the same way that he had explained suffering in sutta 3 [106]. ]

[110] 7. Grasping. (Upādāniyasutta). [Here the Budddha explains grasping in the same way that he had explained suffering in sutta 3 [106]. ]

[111] 8. Understanding (internal). (Ajjhattikāyatanapariānanasutta). By not comprehending, nor understanding, nor abandoning nor detaching from the organs of sense it is not possible to destroy suffering.

[112] 9. Understanding (external) (Bāhirāyatanapariānanasutta). [Same as the previous sutta except that the organs of sense are replaced by their results (like objeccts, sounds. etc.).]

[113] 10. Overhearing. (Upassutisutta). While meditating in solitude the Buddha uttered a Dhamma teaching: "Because of eye and objects (seen) eye-consciousness arise. Together there arise contact. Dependent on contact feeling arises then craving and grasping arise. Thus arise being (bhava), birth, decay and death,and the whole mas of suffering. This is also the case with the other sense organs". This utterance was overheard by a monk. The Buddha noticed this and advised the monk to commit it to memory as it belongs to the basics of the righteous life.

2. Lokakāmagunavagga – Chapter on worldly sensual elements.

[114] 1. Māra's noose 1. (Paṭhamārapāsasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "There are objects congnized by the eye which are desirable, pleasant, delightful, passion-fraught, and lustful. A monk desiring them and clinging then has gone to Mātr's home, come undert his sway and fallen into his noose. If he rejects this is freed from the noose".

[115] 2. Māra's noose 2. (Dutiyamārapāsasutta). [Same as the previous sutta except that the eye is replaced by the mind.]

[116] 3. End of the world. (Lokanatsutta). The Buddha declared to the monks: "The end of the world is not to be learned, seen, gone to, by going to world's end. Nor is the end of sufering not be made without going to world's end". After that the Buddha departed. The monks could not undersand the detailed meaning of this declaration and they decided to consult venerable Ananda on the matter. Ananda started by admonishing the monks that thet should have asked the detailed meaning from the Buddha himslf and later relented gave his own explanation as follows: "In the Ariyan discipline 'the world' is that by which one is conscious of the world, by that which one has conceit of the world. One is conscious of the world and develops conceit about it by the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and the mind". He added that if the monks needed further explanation they should consult the Buddha himself. The monks then did this and the Buddha said: "Ananda is a sage of great wisdom. If you had asked me this I would have explained it in the same way as Ananda did. Do bear it in mind."

[117] 4. Worldly sensual elements. (śāmaguṇasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Before my enlightenment if I thought of previous sensual elements my thoughts would run wild. For this reason I thought that I should practice watchfulness and concentration of mind. You should also do the same. Those sensual elements that arise from the eye, ear and other sense organs you should practice watchfulness and concentration of mind". Then the Buddha departed. The monks decided to consult venerable Ananda to get a detailed explanation of what the Buddha had said so succintly. Venerable Ananda said that the Buddha's pronouncement referred to the current sixfold sphere (and not to worry about the past). He said that they should cnsult the Buddha for further explanation. But when they did this the Buddha gave the same reply that he had given in the previous sutta.

[118] 5. Sakka's question. (Sakkapañhasutta). Once when the Buddha was residing in Gijjhakuta near Rajagaha Sakka, the ruler of the devas, approached him and asked: "Why in this world are some beings fully set free in this very life, while some beings are not so set free ?", The Buddha answered: "There are objects cognizable by the eye ... leading to grasping and craving. If a monk grasps and craves for them he is not set free. If not he is set free in this very life".

[119] 6. Pañcasikha. (Pañcasikhasutta). [In this sutta the Gandhabba deva Pañcasikha asks the same question of the Buddha as in the previous sutta and is replied in the same way.]

[120] 7. Sāriputta on living well. (Sāriputtasaddhivihārikasutta). Once a monk came to venerable Sāriputta at the Jetavana in Sāvtthi and said: "My fellow lodger has renounced the training and gone back to the lower life". The Buddha said: "This happens when one who has a door of his faculties ungurarded, is immoderate in eating, and not given to watchfulness. Such a one will not be able to live the righteous life".
       Sariputta explained further: "To have the facultires guarded a monk when seeing an object should not be misled by its superficial appearance. To be moderate in eating the monk should take his food thoughtfully and prudently, not for sport, not for indulgence, not for personal charm or adornment, but just enough for the support and upkeep of the body and allay its pains. To be watchful the monk when walking or sitting should clear his mind of hindrances. So should you too abide.

[121] 8. Advice to Rāhula. (Rāhulovādasutta). Once when the Buddha was meditating at the Jetavana in Sāvatthi he thought that it was time to bring venerable Rāhula to a state that leads to perfection. Accordingly he went with Rāhula to the Blind Wood (Andhavana). They were followed by a host of devas who were curious to hear what the Buddha had to say to Rāhula.
       The Buddha began with a dialectical approach to Rāhula asking him a series of questions to establish him in the right direction. He made Rāhula admit these 9 propositions regarding the eye: (1) The eye is impermanent; (2) what is impermanent is suffering; (3) it is not correct to say regarding them: 'it is me, I am it, it is my self'; (4) objects seen are impermanent; (5) eye-consciousness is impermanent; (6) eye-contact is impermanent; (7) feeling, perception, activities, and consciousness produced by eye-contact are impermanent; (8) what is impermanent is suffering; (9) it is not correct to say regarding what is impermanent and suffering: 'it is me, I am it, it is my self'. Then Rāhula admits these same propositions with regards to the tongue and the mind.
       The Buddha concluded by saying: "The Ariyan disciple is averse to them (the six organs of sense and their concomitants) and is set free. He realizes: 'Destroyed is birth, lived is the righteous life, done is the task. There is no hereafter' ". At the conclusion of this session the mind of Rāhula was freed from the intoxicants (ādavas) without grasping. The Dhamma-eye was established in the countless devas who were present.

[122] 9. Fetter. (Saṃyojaniyadhammasutta). In this sutta the he Buddha teaches the monks about what leads to bondage and about the fetter. He said that the products of the sense organs, that is: objects, sounds, tastes, smells, touches and mind-objects lead to bondage. He said that the desire and the lust for them is the etter.

[123] 10. Grasping. (Upādaniyadhammasutta). [In this sutta the same things considered as a fetter in the previous sutta are considered as the things that lead to grasping.]

3. Gahapativagga – Chapter on the heads of households.

[124] 1. Vesāli. (Vesāliæsutta). Here Ugga a householder of Vesāli came to the Buddha and asked the same question that Sakka had asked ('Why some are set free in this very life and others not?') in Sutta [118] and gets the same answer.

[125] 2. Vajjī. (Vajjīsutta). Here the same question as in the previous sutta is asked by householders in Hatthigāma in Vajjī and is answered in the same way.

[126] 3. Nālandā. (sutta). Here the same question as in the previous sutta is asked by Upāli a householder in Nālandā and is answered in the same way.

[127] 4. Bhāradvāja. (Bhāradvājasutta). Once at the Ghositārāma King Udena asked the venerable Piṇḍola Bhāradvāja the question 'Why do happy young men who had not experienced passions (kāma) practice the holy life for their entire life ?'. Bhāradvāja said that that the Buddha had said that these young men regard women as their mothers. Asked for another reason he said that the Buddha had said that the body consists of a mass of impurities. The King said that while some monks may regard the body as such others might look at the good side and asked if there was yet another reason. Bhāradvāja said that the Buddha had said that monks should watch over their faculties. Seeing an object with the eye, one should not be misled by its outer aspects lest evil, unprofitable states, might overwhelm one who has not controlled the eye faculty. Same with ear and sound, smell and nose, tongue and taste, body and touch and mind and mind-states. Monks seek to attain control of their faculties. Bhāradvāja said that this was the reason why young men become monks for life.
       The King praised Bhāradvāja for this answer to his question. He said that when he entered his palace with senses unguarded he is a prey to lustful thoughts. But this did not happen, when he has body, speech and mind guarded. He said that from now on he will take refuge in the Buddha and asked Bhāradvāja to take him as a lay follower.

[128] 5. Soṇa. (Soṇasutta). Here Soṇa the son of a householder of Rajagaha came to the Budddha and asked the same question that Sakka had asked ('Why some are set free in this very life and others not?') in Sutta [118] and gets the same answer.

[129] 6. Ghosita. (Ghositasutta). Once when venerable Ananada was living in Kosambi the housefather Ghosita came to see him and asked: "How far has the Buddha spoken about diversity of elements?". Ananda said: "When the eye and objects seen are pleasing, displeasing or neutral eye-consciousness occurs with feelings which are pleasing, displeasing or neural. The same occurs with elements of ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. This is how diversity of elements have been spoken of by the Buddha".

[130] 7. Hāliddaka. (Hāliddakānisutta). Once when venerable Mahākaccāna was staying in Avanti the housefather Hāliddaka came to him and asked: "How far is it that owing to diversity in elements there arises diversity of contact, and from that diversity of feeling?". Mahākacāna said: "Seeing a pleasant object with the eye a monk experiences eye-consciousness that is pleasant, so also for unpleasant and neutral eye-consciousness. The same occurs with hearing a sound, smelling a scent, tasting a flavour, touching with the body and cognizing a mind-state. Owing to this diversity of elements there is diversity in contact and diversity in feeling".

[131] 8. Nakulapitu. (Nakulapitusutta). Once while in Bhaggi the housefather Nakulpitu came to the Buddha and asked the same question that Sakka had asked ('Why some are set free in this very life and others not?') in Sutta [118] and gets the same answer.

[132] 9. Lohicca. (Lohiccasutta). Once venerable Mahākaccāna was living in a forest hut in Avanti when a number of lads followers of the brahmin Lohicca came and made a nuisance of themselves calling the monk a shaveling and other derogatory comments, Then Mahākaccāna came out and admonished the lads in verse saying: "The brahmins of old were well guarded in their sense doors and kept the ancient rules. But many now are drunk with pride in their birth and indulge in vain penances, wear rough hides, have matted hair, chant empty rites and rituals, and so on. But the way to attain the highest is to tame the mind and be considerate to every living thing". The lads then went to Lohicca and said that the monk Mahākaccāna was attacking and and abusing brahmins. Lohicca wanted to verify this report for himself and went to see Mahākaccāna who repeated what he had told the lads. Then Lohicca wanted to know how one is unguarded in the sense doors. Mahākaccāna said: "A certain person seeing an object with the eye will find it pleasing or displeasing. His mind is distracted and he is not emancipated. To be guarded in the eye faculty he should not become attached to it if it is pleasing or repelled if it is not pleasing. He dwells with fixed attention and boundless mind. He realizes its true nature and unprofitable states cease without remainder. The same occurs with sounds heard in the ear, and with the input from the other organs of sense. This is how he is unguarded in the sense doors". Lohicca was pleased with this explanation and asked that when Mahākaccāna goes on his alms round he could also visit the house of Lohicca and sit down on a prepared seat and address the lads and maidens so that they may hear something profitable.

[133] 10. Verahaccāni (sutta). Once the venerable Udayin was staying at Kamandaya, when a young resident pupil of the brahmin lady of the Verahacāni clan, came to visit him. Udayin taught him and made him happy with pious talk. The young lad returned to the brahmin lady and related his experience. Then the lady asked the lad to invite Udayin for the meal the next day which he did. Udayin came to the meal and after it was over the lady put on her sandals, sat down on a high seat, veiled her head, and said to Udayin: "Recluse, preach dhamma to me". At this Udayin said: "A time will come for that, sister", and departed.
       For the second time the young lad visited Udayin and was rewarded with a Dhamma talk. He went back to the brahmin lady and told her of this. The lady said that Udayin did not give a talk when asked when he came for the meal. The lad said that this was because she had worn sandals, sat in a high chair and veiled her head. She then asked the lad to invite Udayin again for a meal, which was done and accepted. This time after the meal the lady put off her sandals, took a low seat, unveiled her head and asked Udayin: "Owing to what do, or do not, the Arahants point out weal and woe ?". Then Udayin said: "When there is eye, sister, the Arahants point out weal and woe. When eye exists not the Arahants do not point out weal and woe. So also with regard to tongue and mind. Where mind exists not they do not point out weal and woe". At this the Brahmin lady of the Verahaccani clan said to the venerable Udayin: "Excellent, sir !  I Excellent, sir ! You have set forth the Dhamma . I myself will go for refuge to the Buddha, the Dhamma and the Order of Bhikkhus. Let the worthy Udayin regard me as a lay-disciple from now on so long as life shall last".

4. Devadahavagga – Chapter on the Devadaha.

[134] 1. Devadaha. (Devadahasutta). At Devadaha in the Sakyan territory the Buddha addressed the monks: "I neither declare nor not declare that all monks need to strive with respect to the sixfold sense sphere. The Arahants do not need to strive earnestly as they have destroyed the intoxicants (āsavas) and the fetters of becoming and set themselves free. But those who still aspire to that security have to strive earnestly because there are objects cognizable by the eye that are delightful or repulsive. They cannot lay hold of them though they touch the mind again and again and they persist. Strenuous energy is needed to set up mindfulness and calm the body and establish one-pointedness in the mind. They need to strive earnestly in respect of the sixfold sphere of sense". What is said with respect to the eye is repeated for the other sense organs.

[135] 2. The moment. (Khaṇasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "It is well for you that the moment for living the righteous life has come. I have seen the hells of the sense spheres where what one sees with the eye (or hears with the ear, or smells with the nose, or tastes with the tongue, or touches with the body, or cognizes with the mind) appear as unpleasant, uninviting, ugly and repulsive. I have seen heavens of the sense spheres where what one sees with the eye (or hears, or smells or tastes or touches or cognizes) appear as inviting, charming and lovely. But it is well for you that have here the moment for living the righteous life".

[136] 3. Objects 1. (Paṭhamarūpārāmasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Devas and humans are excited by objects (rūpā). But they are unstable that is why devas and humans live in suffering. But the Tathāgata does not take delight in objects and lives in peace".

[137] 4. Objects 2. (Dutiyarūpārāmasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "What is not of you put it away. The eye, tongue, mind is not of you. Putting them away, it will be for your profit and welfare. A man burning rubbish in the Jetavana is not burning you because it it not your self. Neither are the products of your sixfold sense sphere".

[138] 5. Not yours 1. (Paṭhmnatumhākamsutta). [Same as the previous sutta except that objects, sounds, scents, savours, tangibles and mind-states replace eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind.]

[139] 6. Not yours 2. (Duitiyanatumhākamsutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The eye is impermanent. Whatever conditions it is also impermanent. Owing to impermanence the eye has come into being, how could the eye be permanent ? And it is the same with the other organs of sense. Seeing this the well-taught Ariyan disciple is repelled by the eye and the other sense spheres. He does not lust for them and he realizes: 'For life in these conditions there is no hereafter' ".

[140] 7. Personal Impermanence. (Ajjhattāniccahetusutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The eye and the other organs of sense are impermanent. The Ariyan disciple does not lust for them and repels them. He realizes: "Birth is ended, lived is the holy life, done is the task, there is no more of this' ".

[141] 8. Personal suffering. (Ajjhattadukkhahetusutta). [Same as the previous sutta with 'impermanent' replaced by 'suffering'.]

[142] 9. Personal no self . (Ajjhattānattahetusutta). [Same as the previous sutta with 'suffering' replaced by 'no self'.]

[143] 10. External impermanence. (Bahirāniccahetusutta). [Same as [140] (sutta 7) with the eye, ear, etc, replaced by their products objects, sounds, etc.]

[144] 11. External suffering. (Bahiradukkhahetusutta).[Same as [141] (sutta 8) with the eye, ear, etc, replaced by their products objects, sounds, etc.]

[145] 12. External no self (Bahirānattahetusutta). [Same as [142] (sutta 9) with the eye, ear, etc, replaced by their products objects, sounds, etc.]

5. Navapurāṇavagga – Chapter on New and Old

[146] 1. Cesstion of action. (Kammanirodhasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach you action old and new, the ceasing of action and the way to do it. Old action is the way of viewing the eye, tongue and mind in the past intentionally or not. New action is action caused by body, speech and mind done now. The ceasing of new action is their complete cessation. The way of doing this is to follow the noble Ariyan Eightfold Path (Right View, Right Intention, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Living, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, and Right Concentration).

[147] 2. Impermanence helpful to Nibbāna. (Aniccanibbānasappāyasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The way that is helpful for Nibbāna. is for a monk to regard the eye and its objects, eye-consciousness, and eye-contact, as impermanent. Those good, bad or neutral states which arise by eye-contact should also be regarded as impermanent. The same with the ear, the nose, the tongue, savours, tongue-consciousness, tongue-contact, mind, mind-states, mind-consciousness, and mind-contact. This is the way that is helpful for Nibbāna.

[148] 3. Suffering helpful to Nibbāna. (Dukkhanibbānasappāyasutta). [The same as the previous sutta with 'Impermanance' replaced by 'suffering'.]

[149] 4. No-self helpful to Nibbāna. (Anattanibbānasappāyasutta). [The same as the previous sutta with 'suffering' replaced by 'no-self'.]

[150] 5. Helpful to nibbāna. (Nibbānasappāyasutta). [Sane as [147] Sutta 2.]

[151] 6. Resident pupil and teacher. (Antevāzsikasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The righteous life can be lived without a resident pupil and a teacher. A monk dwelling with a resident pupil or teacher does so woefully not at ease. Here 'resident pupil' means an unprofitable state that arises when the monk sees an object with the eye or hears a sound with the ear and so on for the other sense organs. Because these unprofitable states beset him, he is also called 'dwelling with a teacher'. To dwell at ease he should not have unprofitable states arising from the organs of sense. Without a resident pupil, and without a teacher is this righteous life lived".

[152] 7. To what purpose? (Kimatthiyabrahmacariyasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "If wanderers ask you to what purpose is the holy life lived under Gotama you should say for the complete elimination of suffering. If they ask what suffering is you should say: 'Suffering is the eye, the objects it sees, eye-contact, the good, bad or neutral states experienced through it and through mind-contact – all these are also suffering. It is for the end of suffering that the righteous life is lived under Gotama the recluse".

[153] 8. Is there a method? (Atgthinukhopariyāyasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Is there a method apart from belief, inclination, hearsay, argument as to method, reflection on reasons, and delight in speculation (saddhā, ruciyā, anussava, ākāraparivitakka, diṭṭhinijjhānakkhantiya, byākareyya) that could affirm insight, thus: 'Ended is birth, lived is the righteous life, done is the task, for life in these conditions there is no hereafter' ?". There is indeed a method. When a monk sees and object with the eye he can determine if he has lust or if he has no lust. To do this the monk does not have to go by belief, inclination, hearsay, and so on. He could do so through the eye of wisdom. He can affirm with insight: ' Ended is birth, lived is the righteous life, done is the task, for life in these conditions there is no hereafter' ".

[154] 9. Perfect in faculty. (Indriyasampannasutta). A certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How is one perfect in faculty ?". The Buddha said: "If a monk observes the rise and fall in the eye as faculty, is repelled by the eye as faculty he does not lust for it. Similarly for the ear, nose, tongue, body, and the mind. Then the knowledge arises in him: " Freed am I by freedom," so that he realizes, "Ended is birth, lived is the righteous life, done is the task, for life in these conditions there is no hereafter'. This monk is perfect in faculty".

[155] 10. Dhmma teacher. (Dhammakahikapuccasutta). A certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How far is one a dhamma teacher ?". The Buddha said: "A monk who teaches a doctrine of repugnance for the eye, for its fading out, for its cessation, he may well be called a Dhamma teacher. If he is set free from grasping by his repugnance and ceasing of the eye, well may he be called a winner of Nibbāna in this very life".

3. Catutapaññāsa – The Fourth Fifty suttas

1. Nandikkhayavagga – Chapter on Destruction of the bait

[156] 1. Internal destruction of bait. (Ajjhattanandikkhaysutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "When a monk sees that the eye is impermanent, he has right view and is repelled. The destruction of the bait leads to destruction of lust and vice versa. Then the mind is set free, and it is called well-freed. So also for the other sense-organs.

[157] 2. External destruction of bait. (Bhāhiranandikkhaysutta). [Same as previous sutta except that the sense organs are replaced by what they produce like objects, sounds, and so on. ]

[158] 3. Internal impermanent bait. (i>Ajattaaniccanandikkhayasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "You should apply your mind to the eye and regard its true nature. Then you will see that it is impermanent and you will be repelled. The bait of the eye is destroyed. So with the other sense organs.

[159] 4. External impermanent bait. (Bāhiraaniccanandikkhayasutta). [Same as previous sutta except that the sense organs are replaced by what they produce like objects, sounds, and so on. ]

[160] 5. Jivaka's mango grove (concentration). (Jīvakaambavanasamādhisutta). At Rajagaha in Jivaka's mango grove the Buddha addressed the monks: "Practice concentration and you will know reality as it is. The eye and its objects, eye-consciousness, eye-contact and resulting good, bad and indifferent states are all seen to be impermanent. Practice concentration". [Same as previous sutta except that the sense organs are replaced by what they produce like objects, sounds, and so on. ]

[161] 6. Jivaka's mango grove (solitude). (Jīvakambavanapaṭisallānasutta). [Same as the previous sutta with 'concentration ' replaced by 'solitude'.]

[162] 7. Koṭṭhika impermanance. (Koṭṭhikaaniccasutta). Venerable Koṭṭhika came to the Buddha and asked to be instruction in the Dhamma in brief so that he may dwell solitary, remote, earnest, ardent and aspiring. The Buddha said: "Put away desire for what is impermanent. The eye and its objects, eye-consciousness, eye-contact and resulting good, bad and indifferent states are all impermanent. You should put away desire for them.

[163] 8. Koṭṭhika suffering.(Koṭṭhikadukkhasutta). [Same as the previous sutta withe 'impermanence' replaced by 'suffering'.]

[164] 9. Koṭṭhika no soul. (Koṭṭhikanattasuttasutta). [Same as the previous sutta withe 'suffering' replaced by 'no soul'.]

[165] 10. Wrong view. (Micchādiṭṭhipahānasutta). A monk came to the Buddha and asked how wrong view could be abandoned. The Buddha answered: "By knowing and seeing the eye (and the other organs of sense) are impermanent wrong view is abandoned".

[166] 11. Own body view. (Sakkāyadiṭṭhipahānasutta). [The same as the previous sutta with the organs of sense replaced by "own body".]

[167] 12. About the self. (Attānudiṭṭhipahānasutta). >. [The same as the previous sutta with the 'own body' replaced by 'speculation about the self'.]

2. Saṭṭhipeyyālavagga – Chapter on the Sixty summaries

[This chapter contains 60 summaries of suttas previously stated in this collection and are given in 60 text blocks in the Sixth Council text numbered from [168] to [228]. As they are mostly repetitions of suttas already summarized only the Pali title of the sutta is given with an indication of what is to be avoided.]

[168] 1. Ajjhattaaniccachandsutta. Personal impermanent desire.
[169] 2. Ajjhattaaniccarāgasutta. Personal impermanent lust
[170] 3. Ajjhattaaniccachandarāgasutta. Personal impermanent desire and lust
[171-173] 4-6. Dukkhachandādisutta. Suffering and desire
[174-176] 7-9. Anattachandādisutta. No-soul and desire
[177-179] 10-12. Bāhirāniccachandādisutta. External impermanent desire.
[180-182] 13-15. Bāhiradukkhachandādisutta. External sorrow and desire.
[183-185] 16-18. Bāhirānattachandādisutta. External no-s0ul and desire.
[186] 19. Ajjhattātītāniccasutta. Internal past impermanent.
[187] 20. Ajjhattānāgatāniccasutta. Interal future impermanent.
[188] 21. Ajjhattapaccuppannāniccasutta. Internal present impermanent.
[189-191] 22-24. Ajjhattātītādidukkhasutta. Internalpastsuffering.
[192-194] 25-27. Ajjhattātītādianattasutta. Intenal past no-soul.
[195-197] 28-30. Bāhirātītādianiccasutta. External past impermanent.
[198-200] 31-33. Bāhirātītādidukkhasutta. External past suffering.
[201-203] 34-36. Bāhirātītādianattasutta. External past no-soul.
[204] 37. Allhattātītayāniccasutta. Internal past impermanent.
[205] 38. Ajjhattānāgatayadaniccasutta. Internal future impermanance/
[206] 39. Ajjhattapac uppannayadaaniccasutta. Internal future impermanance.
[207-209] 40-42. Ajjhattātītādiyadiyaṃdukkhasutta. Internal past suffering.
[210-212] 43-45. Ajjhattātīdiyaanattasutta. Internal past no-soul.
[213-215] 46-48. Bāhirātītādiyadaaniccasutta. External past-like impermanentr.
[216-218] 49-51. Bāhirātītādiyaṃdukkhasutta. External past-like impermanentr.
[219-221] 52-54.
Bāhirātītādiyaanattasutta
.
External past no-soul.
[222] 55. Ajjhattāyatanaaniccasutta. Internal sense organs impermanent.
[223] 56. Ajattāyatanadukkhasutta. Internal sense organs suffering.oo
[224] 57. Ajjhattāyatanaanattasutta. Internal sense organs no-soul.
[225] 58. Bāhirāyatanaaniccasutta. External sense organs impermanent.
[226] 59. Bāhirāyatanadukkhasuttasutta. External sense organs suffering.
[227] 60. Bāhirāyatanaanattasutta. External sense organs no-soul.

3. Samuddavagga – Chapter on the Ocean

[228] 1. The ocean 1. (Paṭhnasamuddasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The worldling speaks of the ocean. By this they mean the heap of water. For the Ariyan disciple the eye of man is the ocean. He who overcomes the objects it impels has crossed the ocean of the eye with its waves, eddies, sharks and devils (rakkha) and stands on solid ground. So also with ths tongue and other sense organs".

[229] 2. The ocean 2. (Dutiyasamuddasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The ocean to the worldling is a flood of water. There are objects cognizable by the eye, savours cognizable to the tongue, mind-states cognizable to the mind. These objects are pleasant and lustful. These are the ocean. There are beings caught in it and unable to cross over the downfall, to end the round of birth".

[230] 3. The fisherman. (Bāḷisikopamasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "A fisherman casts a baited hook into the water and some greedy fish swallows it and becomes a victim of the fisherman. Similarly there are six hooks in the world to the harm and sorrow of beings. These are objects cognizable by the eye, tastes by the tongue, sounds by the ear, scents by the nose, touches by the body and mind-states by the mind. If a monk delights, welcomes and clings to them, he comes to destruction and misfortune from Mara"

[231] 4. The sap tree. (Khīrarukkopamasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "If a monk does not abandon the lust that comes from objects revealed by the eye then even a small object, let alone a large one, can corrupt his mind. The same applies to mind-states cognized by the mind. This is like the sap that flows out of a sap tree like an asatta (or bodhi) tree when a man cuts it with an axe. A monk who is infatuated by the things which are revealed by the six senses will have his mind corrupted by even the smallest thing cognized by his senses".

[232] 5. Kottika. (Koṭṭhikasutta). Once the venerables Kotthika and Sāriputta were staying at Isipatana near Benares when the former asked the latter: "Is the eye the bond (saṃyojana) of the seen object or vice versa. Similarly for tongue and tastes, and mind and and mind-states.?". Sāriputta said: "Neither is the case, only the lust that is generated is the bond. If two oxen are tied together neither ox is the bond of the other, but the yoke that ties them is the bond. If the eye is the bond of the object (or vice versa) then the righteous life cannot be proclaimed. It is the lust and the desire that is the bond, and only by removing the bond can the holy life be led. This is what the Buddha teaches".

[233] 6. Kamabhu. (Kāmabhusutta). [Here the venerable Kāmabhu asks Ananda the same question as in the previous sutta and gets the same answer.]

[234] 7. Udayin. ((Udāyāsutta). Once when venerables Udayin and Ananda were staying at Kosambi Udayin asked: "The Buddha has said that the body is without self. Is this also true of consciousness ?". Ananda questioned Udayin: "If eye-consciousness arises from the eye but if the eye is no more would there be eye-consciousness ?" . Udayin answered: "No". This was then raised with respect to the tongue and the mind and same answer was received. Then Ananda said that it was by the same method that the Buddha established that consciousness was without self. He concluded with the parable of the man in search of heartwood. If he tried to find it in a banana tree trunk he would not find it. Similarly the monk does not find what pertains to the self in the six senses he is set free and realises: 'Birth is destroyed, the holy life lived, the task is done and there is no more of this'.

[235] 8. On fire. (Ādittapariyāyasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "I will give a dhamma discourse with the parable of the fire. If the eye were pierced with a red-hot pin and set on fire there will be no objects to grasp but the consciousness of the satisfaction enjoyed (before) will still stand. If the person then dies his destiny is either hell or animal birth. If the same were to happen to the ear, tongue, nose or body the result would be the same.

[236] 9. The hand and the foot - 1` (Paṭhamahattapādopamasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "With a hand there is taking up or putting down with a foot there is going or coming, with a limb there is bending or stretching, with a belly there is hunger. Without the hand, foot, limb or belly none of this will happen. Similarly with the eye there is eye-contact resulting in weal and woe (sukkhaṃ dukkhaṃ). Without the eye there is no weal or woe. Similarly for the tongue and the mind".

[237] 10. ( sutta). [This is the same as the previous sutta.]

4. Āsīvisavagga – Chapter on the Snake



[238] 1. The snake. ( Āsīvisopamasutta). At Sāvatthi the Buddha addressed the monks: "A man wandering about was told that four deadly snakes were after him. He kept on wandering when he was told that five murderous enemies were also following him. He continued to wander and he was told that that a sixth murderous house-thief was also after him with upraised sword. He continued to wander to a village empty of people. He was told that the village robbers were also after him. He continued to wander until he came to a calm river the near shore of which was dangerous and the further shore was pleasant. Then he collected branches and sticks, made a raft and striving with hands and feet crossed over and stood on firm ground on the other side".
       The Buddha then explained the parable. The four snakes were the basic elements: earth, water fire and air. The five enemies were the factors of grasping: body, feeling, perception, activities and consciousness. The sixth (the murderous house thief ) was lustful desire. The empty village was the internal sixfold sense sphere of eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind. The village robbers were the external products of the senses: objects, sounds, scents, tastes, touches and mind-states. The river was the fourfold flood: desire, becoming, view and ignorance. The thither shore is the own-body (sakkāya) and the further shore is Nibbāna, the raft being the Ariyan Eightfold Path. Striving with hands and feet is energy and effort and firm ground is the Arahant.

[239] 2. Delighting ( Rathopamasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The three ways a monk can dwell happily are: guarding the doors of the sense; moderation in eating; and being watchful.
       "To guard the sense doors the monk on seeing an object with the eye is not attracted by the superficial view but sets a control over it. A similar guard should be set on the impressions received from the other sense organs. Moderation in eating is given by the formula that a monk "takes his food thoughtfully and prudently, not for sport, not for indulgence, not for personal charm and adornment, but sufficient for the support and upkeep of body". Watchfulness means that by day a monk should engage in activities (walking, sitting, and so on) that cleanses his mind. He continues this into the first watch of the night; in the second watch he sleeps in the lion posture; and in the third watch he wakes up early. So long as he does all this Māra does not get a chance.

[240] 3. The tortoise. ( Kummopamasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "Once a tortoise and a jackal were hunting for prey and the tortoise seeing the Jackal pulled in all its five limbs under its shell. The jackal waited for the tortoise to put  out one of its limbs and the tortoise not doing so got tired and went away. A monk should keep guard over his sense faculties Māra gets no opportunity. Just as the tortoise uses its shell as a guard so the monk should use his mind".

[241] 4. Log of wood 1. ( Paṭhamadārukkhandhopamasutta). At Kosambi the Buddha saw a log being carried down the Ganges and pointing it to the monks said: "If this log is not grounded on either shore or does not sink in mid-stream or does not stick on a shoal or does not fall into human or non-human hands or not get caught in a whirlpool or does not rot inwardly or meet with some other obstacle it will slide into the ocean. In the same way if you do not ground on this or that shore, do not sink in mid-stream, do not stick on a shoal, do not fall into human or non-human hands, do not get caught in a whirlpool, and do not rot inwardly, then you will float down to Nibbāna". This was overheard by Nanda the cowherd who requested ordination from the Buddha. The Buddha asked that the cows be returned to their owner which was done. Then the Buddha ordained Nanda who not long after living solitary, earnest and ardent became an Arahant.

[242] 5. Log of wood 2. (Dutiyadārukkhandhopamasutta). [The same episode of the floating log given in the previous sutta is repeated at another place on the Ganges and the same discourse given to the monks.] Then the monk Kimbila asked for clarification of the terms used in the parable. The Buddha said that "this bank" is the sixfold personal sense-sphere, "that bank" is the external sixfold sense-sphere, "sinking in mid-stream" is the bait of lust, "being caught by humans" is back-sliding into the household life, "being caught by non-humans" is wishing to be reborn in a heaven, "being caught in a whirlpool" is the pleasure of the five senses, and "rotting inwardly" is being an immoral evil doer. Then the Buddha was asked to deliver a sermon in a Hall that had newly been constructed and he did so.

[243] 6. Sensual lust. ( Avssutapariyāyasutta). Once the Buddha was saying in Kapilavattu when the Sākyans invited him to open a newly built meeting hall. He accepted and went there the next day accompanied by the monks and the Sākyan people. After a long general talk which pleased the people he dismissed the Sākyans. He then asked venerable Moggallāna to give a Dhamma talk to the monks while he lay down in the lion posture to rest.
       Moggallāna said that he will speak on being subjected to sensual lust as well has how to avoid it. He said that if a monk on seeing an object with the eye is attracted to it, becomes attached to it, does not realize its true nature then Māra comes to him through that sense door. In the same way a monk could become lustful through the other sense doors. He compares this to someone living in a reed hut who faces someone coming with a blazing torch. To be free of lust a monk should not be attracted to objects revealed by the senses. He should dwell with attention focussed on the body and a mind emancipated by wisdom. Them Māra does not get an opportunity just as a man with a torch will not pose danger to one living in a solidly constructed house. After that the Buddha got up from his rest and he praised what Mogallāna had said.

[244] 7. On suffering. ( Dukkhadhammasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "For a monk to know how suffering arises and ends he should know that its cause is the longing for sensual pleasure (kāma). He should know the body, feeling, perceptions, actions and consciousness, the five aggregates (khandā) that constitute the person. He should know that sensual pleasure is like a pit of burning charcoal or a forest of thorns which should be avoided. To do so he should exercise restraint. He should see that unprofitable states of coveting and dejection do not arise. If they do arise they should be dispelled like like drops of water that fall into pan heated all day long. If a king, a minister or a blood relative tries to entice him to give up the robe and to return to the household life with the promise of great wealth he should reject it. It should be impossible to make him accept such an offer just as it would be impossible to reverse the direction of the flow of the Ganges river and make it flow upstream.

[245] 8. The Kimsukha tree. (Kiṃsukopamasutta). Once a monk approached another monk and asked: "When is a monk's insight fully purified?". This monk answered: "When the monk understands the arising and destruction of the sixfold sense sphere". Not satisfied he asked another monk who said: "When the monk understands the arising and destruction of the five factors of grasping." Not satisfied he asked another monk who said: "When the monk understands the arising and the destruction of the four great elements (mahābūta)". Not satisfied he asked another monk who said: "When the monk understands that whatever arises it also has the nature to cease".
       The monk then went to the Buddha told him of the answers he had received and asked the Buddha's opinion. The Buddha in turn related a story: "A man who had not seen a Kimsuka tree asked several people what the Kimsuka tree looked like. One said it is a dark tree like a charred stump, another that it is is reddish tree like a lump of flesh, another that it is a tree with no bark, another that it is a very thick-leaved tree like a like a banyan tree. So to this man at any time the Kimsuka tree is like what the other says it is. Just so, according as the insight of those who answered your question a purified monk is in accordance with that they told you".
       Then the Buddha gave a parable of his own: A certain king had his town well guarded with six gates. Two messengers from the East came to the warden of the gates and asked where the lord of the town was. He directed them to to where four roads meet. So directed they delivered the message of Truth to the king and departed. Then messengers from the West arrived and they too were directed and they too delivered the message of Truth to the king and departed. The Buddha then explained the parable. The town is the body; the six gates are the six-fold sense sphere; the warden of the gates is the mind; the messengers from the East are calm and insight; the lord of the town is consciousness; the place where the four road meet is the four great elements; the message of the Truth is Nibbāna and way they came is the Eightfold path.

[246] 9. The vīṇa (lute). Vīṇsutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "A bhikkhu or bhikkhuni in whom desire and lust has arisen from objects seen with the eye should refrain from them. A worthy man would refrain from desires that arise from the six senses. Just as a cow coming to a corn field will eat ravenously of the corn so the ignorant many-folk delight in the pleasures of sense. But if there is a zealous watcher he will chase away the cow and so preserve the corn. Similarly a monk with a strong mind will stand firm in the face of temptations".
       The Buddha then related a parable. A king heard a delightful and intoxicating sound, and making inquiries heard that it was the sound of a lute. Then he ordered a man to get him a lute. He then broke the lute into pieces burnt them and strewed the ashes into the river. Then he said to his men: 'There goes your lute, but the people are careless and are led astray'. The Buddha concluded his parable saying: "Like that king a monk should investigate the body, feeling. perception, activities and consciousness. In all such investigation there is no 'I', 'me', or 'mine' ".

[247] 10. Six animals. (Cappāṇkopamasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "A wounded man with festering sores goes into a thicket and gets his body scratched and feels more pain. Like that a monk goes to a village is rebuked: 'This monk's life style is a thorn of impurity to the village'. Then there could be restraint or non-restraint (on the part of the monk). Non-restraint occurs when a monk is attached to whatever sensations come from the sense organs such as objects seen. sounds heard and so on. Restraint occurs when he is not so attached and dwells with attention to the body and boundless thoughts".
       Then the Buddha gave a parable to illustrate non-restraint and restraint: A man catches a six animals of different species, namely a snake, a crocodile, a dog, a bird, a jackal and a monkey tying each of them to a separate rope. If he then ties all the ropes together then each animal will try to go to its normal habitat and there will be a struggle. This is compared to non-restraint. But if the ropes are tied to a fixed post then the animals will remain in the same place in proximity to the post. This is compared to restraint.

[248] 11. A sheaf of grain. ( Yavakalāpisutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "A sheaf of grain is laid on the road and six men thresh it with clubs. Finally a seventh person completes the task. Similarly the untaught person is threshed by his sense organs, and finally by the mind".
       Then the Buddha related this story of the battle between the Devas and the Asuras: Before the battle Vepacitti King of the Asuras told the Asuras if we win you must bind Sakka King of the Devas and bring him to my town. Similarly Sakka told the Devas that if they win they should do the same to Vepacitti. The Devas won the battle and Vepacitti found himself before Sakka bound by the fivefold bondage and deprived of the pleasures of the senses.
       Then the the Buddha said: "Subtle is the bondage of Vepacitti but even more so is the bondage of Māra. He who has conceits (māna) is bound to Māra. Conceits are: 'I am', 'This am I', 'I shall be', 'I shall not be,', 'Embodied shall I be', 'Disembodied shall I be', 'I shall be conscious', 'Unconscious shall I be', 'Neither conscious nor unconscious shall I be'. If a person has no such conceits he is free of Māra. You must train yourselves to be free of conceits".

Saṃyutta Nikāya Salāyatana Vagga

36. Vedanāsaṃyutta - 36. Collected Sayings on Feeling

1. Sagāthāvagga -- 1. Chapter with Verses

[249] 1. Concentration (Samādhisutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "There are three kinds of feelings – painful, pleasant, and neither pleasant nor painful. The awakened one knows how they come and when they cease. The monk who has ended them no longer hungers and is set free".

[250] 2. Pleasure (Sukhasutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "He who understands the three feelings is a follower of the Buddha. Internally and externally he knows what suffering is".

[251] 3. Abandoning. (sutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "The tendency (anusaya) to lust for the three feelings should be abandoned. When this is done the monk sees rightly, so say the Greatly Wise One. He who understands this now dies a pure one beyond reckoning".

[252] 4. The bottomless pit. (Pātālasutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "There is no bottomless pit under the Ocean as many think; it is a synonym for the body. He who has not emerged from this pit is not on solid ground. When touched by pain he weeps, but not the Ariyan disciple who has emerged from this pit".

[253] 5. Regarded as. (Daṭṭhabbbasutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "Pleasant feelings should be regarded as suffering, painful feelings as an arrow, neutral feelings as impermanence. The monk who understands this and then dies he dies a pure one beyond reckoning".

[254] 6. The arrow. (Sallasutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "Both the ordinary person and the Ariyan disciple experience feelings. The ordinary person when touched by a painful feeling feels it both in the body and the mind. If it is a painful feeling he weeps and wails. If it is a pleasant feeling sensual pleasure arises in him. If it is a neutral feeling ignorance arises in him. In all cases he is in bondage to his feelings.
       The Ariyan disciple when touched by a feeling only feels it in the body and not the mind. If it is a painful feeling he does not weep and wail and is not in bondage to it. So also in the case of other feelings be is not bound to them and looks on them with repugnance.

[255] 7. Sickness 1. (Paṭhamagilaññasutta) . While in Vesali the Buddha went to the sick ward (gilānasāla), There he addressed the monks: "A monk should die mindful (sata) and composed (sampajāna). To be mindful he should always contemplate the body as transient. To be collected he should be aware of what he is doing at all times. He should contemplate the impermanence of the body and of all kinds of feelings. Just as a lamp goes out when the oil is exhausted so too when bodily endurance reaches its limit life will go out. The bhikkhu knows this. 

[256] 8. Sinckness 2. (Dutiyagilaññasutta) . [Same as the previous sutta with slight changes.]

[257] 9. Impermanence. (Aniccasutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "The three kinds of feelings (painful, pleasant and neutral) are characterised by impermanence, being compounded, and arising due to a cause. They are perishable, changeable, and liable to cease".

[258] 10. Rooted in contact. (Phassamūlakasutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "The three kinds of feelings are born of contact, rooted in contact, and related to contact. It is because of contact that they are felt as painful or pleasant. If contact cease then the feelings come to an end".

2. Rahogatavagga -- 1 Chapter on Solitude.

[259] 1.Solitude. (Rahogatasutta) . Once a monk came to the Buddha and asked him to explain this statement that he had preached: "Whatever is experienced it is connected with suffering". The Buddha said that it was uttered in connection with the impermanence of compounded things. He then explained what ceases when one makes progress through the jhānas ('trances'). In the first jhāna speech (vācā) ceases, in the second initial and sustained thought (vitakkavicāra) , in the third zest (pīti) ceases, in the fourth inbreathing and outbreathing (assāsapassāsa) ceases. Then comes the higher realms (infinite space, infinite consciousness, nothingness, neither perception nor non-perception, cessation of perceptionh and feeling,) Finally comes the destruction of the āsavas when lust, hatred and illusion are extinguished.

[260] 2. The sky 1.(Paṭhamaākāsasutta) . The Buddha said: "Winds blow in all directons through the sky, some dusty, hot and boisterous, others not. So are the feelings felt by the body. An ardent, self-possessed monk undersands all this during his life, and after death he is a saint past reckoning". He followed this with a stanza.

[261] 3. The sky 2, (Dutiyaākāsasutta) . [Same as the previous sutta but without the stana.]

[262] 4. The guest house. (Agārasutta) . The Buddha said: "Just as people from all quarters, of all castes come to a guest house so do all kinds of feelings assail the body".

[263] 5. Ananda 1. (Paṭhamaānandasutta) . The venerable Ananda came to the Buddha and asked: "What is the satisfaction, the misery, and the refuge from feeling ?". The Buddha said that feelings (pleasant, painful, and neutral) all arise from contact. The way of ceasing feeling is the Noble Eightfold Path. The satisfaction comes the pleasure and mental ease, the misery from their impermanence, and the refuge is by abandoning desire and lust for feelings. He said that this was a gradual process and gave the progression through the jhānas (trances) as given in sutta [259] (on Solitude), ending in the extinguishing of lust, hatred and illusion.

[264] 6. Ananda 2. (Dutiyaānandasutta) . [In this sutta Ananda again asks a question of the Buddha very similar to that asked in the previous sutta. The Buddha gives virtually the same answer given in that sutta.]

[265] 7. Numerous 1. (Paṭhamasambahulasutta) . Numerous bhikkhus came to the Buddha and asked: "What are feelings, how do they originate, how do they cease and what is way leadingf to their ending?". The Buddha fave the same answere he gave in in sutta [259] (on Solitude).

[266] 8. Numerous 2. (Dutiyasambahulasutta) . [Here another group of numerous monks came to the Buddha and asked the same question as in the previous sutta. The Buddha gave the same answer.]

[267] 9. Pañcakaṅga (Pañcakaṅgasutta) . In this sutta a carpenter called Pañcakaṅga came to the venerable Udayin and asked how many kinds of feeling had the Buddha spoken of. Udayin answered three kinds: pleasant, painful and neutral. But the carpenter insisted that that it was only two: pleasant and painful. This exchange took place a couple of times and neither could convince the other. Venerable Ananda overheard this and went to the Buddha to get the matter clarified.
       The Buddha said: "In my way of explaining feelings there are 2, 3, 5, 6, 18, 36 and 108 kinds of feelings. If people understand my way of explaining they will not quarrel about the number. Pleasure arises from the five organs of sense the eye, ear, nose, tongue and body. There is another pleasure more excellent than that." The Buddha then gave in succession the various pleasures each one better than the previous. These are the pleasures of the following: (1) The first trance, (2) the second trance, (3) the third trance, (4) the fourth trance, (5) the infinity of space, (6) infinity of consciousness, (7) the realm of nothingness, (8) realm which neither perception nor non-perception, (9) the realm of the cessation of perception and feeling.
       The Buddha concluded: "If wanderers say that the Buddha concluded that the cessation of perception and feeling is the hgighes plesasure you should say: 'The Buddha did not proclaim that as pleasure in connection with just pleasant feeling, but wheresoever pleasure is obtained it is pleasure whatever its nature is' "

[268] 10. The Bhikkhu. (Bhikkhusutta) . [The same as what the Buddha said to Ananda but now said to bhikkhus in general. ]

3. Aṭṭhasatapariyāyavagga -- 3. Chapter on hundred and eight ways.

[269] 1. Sīvaka. (Sīvakasutta) . Once when the Buddha was residing at the Veluvana in Rajagaha the wanderer Sīvaka approached him and asked: "Some wanderers and brahmins believe that pleasure, pain, or other mental state a person enjoys is due to a previous act, what does master Gotama say about this. The Buddha said: "Some pains a person suffers suffers come from bile, phlegm, wind, and bodily humours; others from the seasonal changes or stress from unexpected happenings or external attacks; still others from the ripeness of one's karma. These wanderers and brahmins go beyond personal experience and what is generally acknowledged by the world. Therefore I declare those wanderers and brahmins to be in the wrong." Then Sivaka accepted the words of the Buddha and asked to be a lay follower and took refuge in the Buddha.

[270] 2. The one hundred and eight. (Aṭṭhasatasutta) . The Buddha addressed the monks: "My Dhamma can be expounded based on two, three, five, six, eighteen, thirty-six, and one hundred and eight feelings. The two are bodily and mental feelings; the three are pleasant, painful and neutral feelings; the five are the controlling powers of pleasure, pain, joy, grief and indifference; the six are the feeling born of eye-contact, ear-contact, nose-, tongue-, body- and mind-contact; the eighteen are the six ways each of giving attention to joy, grief and indifference; the thirty-six feelings are the six forms of joy concerned with the worldly life, the six forms of joy concerned with giving it up, the six forms of sorrow concerned with the worldly life, the six forms of sorrow concerned with giving it up, the are six forms of indifference concerned with the worldly life and the six forms of indifference concerned with giving itup; the one hundred and eight feelings are thirty-six feelings of the past, thirty-six of the future, and thirty-six feelings of the present time."

[271] 3. A certain bhikkhu. (Aññatrabhikkhusutta) . A certain bhikkhu came to the Buddha and questioned him relating to feelings: What are they; what is their arising, ceasing and satisfaction; what is the way to this arising, ceasing and satisfaction ?. The Buddha said: "There are three feelings, pleasant, painful and neutral. They arise from contact, and they lead to craving. By the ceasing of contact comes the ceasing of feeling. The Ariyan Eightfold Path, is the way leading to the ceasing of feelings. The pleasure and happiness which arise owing to feeling is the satisfaction in feeling. The misery of feeling is their impermanence, and unsubstantial nature. The abandoning of desire and lust is the escape from feelings.

[272] 4. The past. (Pubbasutta) . Addressing the monks the Buddha said that before his Enlightenment when he was only a Bodhisattva it occurred to him what the feelings are, how they arise, cease and the method their ceasing. The rest of this sutta is what the Buddha told the bhikkhu in the previous sutta.

[273] 5. Knowledge, (ñāṇasutta) . [This is a continuation of the last sutta in which the Buddha says that after the insight into the nature of feelings had come to him there arose in him things not heard of before, vision, knowledge, insight, wisdom, and light. This basically is what the Buddha told the bhikkhu in sutta [271] 'A certain bhikkhu'.] .

[274] 6. Many bhikkhus. (Sambahulasutta) . [Here a number of bhikkhus came to the Buddha and asked the same question asked by the Bhikkhu in sutta [271] 'A certain Buhikkhu'. They got the same answer as in that sutta.]

[275] 7. Recluses and brahmins 1. (Paṭhamsamaṇabrāhmaṇasutta) . The Buddha said: "Monks there are the three feelings, pleasant, painful and neutral. Recluses or brahmins who do not understand them as they really are, their arising, destruction, satisfaction and misery, and the escape from them, are not approved as recluses or brahmins by other recluses and brahmins. But those who have done so, are approved among recluses as recluses and among brahmins as brahmins. They have realized, the profit of being recluses or brahmins, and having so attained do live in the present life".

[276] 8. Recluses and brahmins 2. (Dutiyasamaṇabrāhmaṇasutta) . [Same as the previous sutta.]

[277] 9. Recluses and brahmins 3. (Yatiyasamaṇabrāhmaṇa sutta) . >. [Same as the previous sutta.]

[278] 10. Purified. (Suddhikasutta) . The Buddha said: "There are these three feelings, pleasant, painful and neutral." [Not having them one is purified.]

[279] 11. With defilements. (Nirāmisasutta) . The Buddha said: "There are three kinds of relish (pīti): carnal, not carnal, and without all canality. There are also the same three kings of pleasure, equanimity and release. Carnal relish is taking delight and lust in what is discerned by the five sense organs (eye, ear, nose, tongue and body). Not carnal relish is that which arises in a bhikkhu who has attained to the first to the fourth jhāna. The relish without all carnality is that of the bhikkhu who has destroyed the intoxicants (āsava). The three pleasures are also the same as the three kinds of relish.
       The equanimity that is carnal is that of the monk who had developed equanimity to the five sense organs. The equanimity that is not carnal is the equanimity towards the five sense developed by the monk who has reached the four jhānas. The indifference that is devoid of all carnality is that which is developed by the monk who has destroyed the Asavas. In the same way the kinds of release that are carnal can be understood.

37. Mātugāma Saṃyutta - 37. Collected Sayings on Womankind

1. Paṭhamapeyyāla vagga - 1. The first repetition

[280] 1. Women (Mātugāmasutta) . The Buddha said: "A woman with these five qualities does not charm a man: not beauteous, not wealthy, not moral, slack, and childless. A wman with opposite qualities charms a man."

[281] 2. Men. (Purisasutta) . [The Buddha said that a man is not charming for waman if he has the same five qulities listed in the previoues sutta.]

[282] 3. Special woes of women. (Āvenikadukkhasutta) . The Buddha said: "A woman has to undergo these suffering which a man is exempt from: On marriage leaves her home and goes to her husband's, menses, pregnancy, child bearing, wait upon the man".

[283] 4. Three things. (Tihidammehisutta) . Three thinbgs cause a woman to go to hell after death: Stays at home with a heart of stenginess, jealosy and sensualituy".

[284] 5. Getting angry. (Kodhanasutta) . Venerable Anuruddha came to the Buiddha and said that he saw with the divine eye that women go to hell after death. He asked the Buddha why this was so. The Buddha said this was due to five things: Infidelity (asaddha), lack of shame (ahirika), being deceitful (anottappa), being wrathful ( kodhano) and lacking wisdom (duppañño)."

[285] 6. Hatred. (Upanisasutta) . [Here hatred (upanāha) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[286] 7. Envy. (Issukīsutta) . [Here envy (issuka) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[287] 8. Stinginess. (Maccārīsutta) . [Here Stinginess (maccāri) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[288] 9. Adultery. (Aticārīsutta) . [Here adultery (aticāra) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[289] 10. Immorality. (Dussīlasutta) . [Here immirality (dussīla) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[290] 11. Little knowledge. (Appasutasutta) . [Here little knowledge (appasuta) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[291] 12. Indolence. (Kusiītasutta) . [Here indolence (kusīta) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[292] 13. Muddlehededness. (Muṭṭhassatisutta) . [Here muddleheadedness (muṭṭhassati) is added to the four qualities listed in sutta [284] as leading woment to go to hell making five in all].

[293] 14. The five dreads. (Pañcaverasutta) . The Buddha said that possessed of five things a woman is born in hell. These are takes life, takes what is not given, acts wrongly in sense-desires, tells lies, indulges in fermented and distilled liquor, intoxicants causing sloth.

2. Dutiyaeyyāla – 2. The second repetition

[294] 1. (sutta) . Venerable Anuruddha came to the Buddha and said that he saw with the divine eye that women go to heaven. He asked the Buddha why this was so. The Buddha said this was due to five things: Faithfulness (saddho, shame (hirimā), modesty (ottappa), not being wrathful (akkodhano) and wise (paññavā)."

[295] 2. Not forgetful. (Anupanāhīsutta) . [Same as [294] but 'being not forgetful' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[296] 3. Non-jealousy. (Anissukīsutta) . [Same as [294] but 'being non jealous' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[297] 4. Not stinginess. (Amaccharīsutta) . [Same as [294] but 'non-stinginess' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[298] 5. Non adultery. (Anaticārīsutta) . [Same as [294] but 'non-adultery' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[299] 6. Good morality. (Susīlasutta) . [Same as [294] but good morality' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[300] 7. Learned. (Bahusutasutta) . [Same as [294] but 'being learned' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[301] 8. Devoted. (Āraddhavīriyasutta) . [Same as [294] but 'being devoted' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[302] 9. Not being muddle-headed. (Upaṭṭhutassatisutta) . [Same as [294] but 'not being muddle-headed' replaces 'not wrathful' as the fourth factor for being born in heaven.]

[303] 10. Five precepts. (Pañcasīlasutta) The Buddha said: "Replete with the five precepts,: Not taking life, not taking what is not given, not indulging n sensual wrong-doing, not telling lies, and not consuming intoxicating drinks a woman goes to heaven after death".

3. Balavagga – The chapter on power

[304] 1. Five powers. (visāradasutta) The Buddha said: "There are five powers of womenfolk: power of beauty, power of wealth, power of kin, power of sons, and power of virtue. Because of these she can dwell at home."

[305] 2. Overpowering. (Pasayhasutta) The Buddha said: "There are five powers of a woman: beauty, wealth, kin, sons, and virtue. Because of these she can overpower her husband.

[306] 3. Conquering. (Abibhuyyasutta) The Buddha said: "Because of her five powers (as above) a woman can conquer her husband".

[307] 4. One (Ekasutta) The Buddha said: "By the one power of authority (issariya) a man can be the better of a woman. Neither the woman's beauty, wealth, kin, sons or virtue is of avail."

[308] 5. Many (Aṅgasutta) The Buddha said: "Of the five powers of a woman if she is defective in any one of them she can rectify this. Thus she can be complete in all five."

[309] 6. Destroying (Nāsentisutta) The Buddha said: "If a woman does not have the power of virtue then even if she has the other powers she is not allowed to stay in the family. But if she has the power of virtue she is allowed to say in the family even if she does not have the other powers."

[310] 7. Cause. (Hetusutta) The Buddha said: "Because of her power of virtue is a woman reborn in heaven even if she does not have the other powers."

[311] 8. Condition, (Thānasutta) The Buddha said: "A woman with no merit will find it hard to achieve these five conditions: Be born in a good family; go as wife to a good family; live in a house without a rival; have a son; have mastery over the husband."

[312] 9. Without fear. (Pañcasīlavisāradasutta) The Buddha said: "A woman will live without fear in her home if she does not take life, does not take what is not given, does not do wrong sensually, does not tell lies, and does not take intoxicants."

[313] 10. Growth. (Vaddhīsutta) The Buddha said: "The Ariyan woman disciple will grow in Ariyan growth if she grows in faith, grows in virtue, grows in learning, grows in generosity and grows in wisdom".

38. Jambukhādaka Saṃyutta - 38. Collected Sayings about Jambukhadaka

[314] 1. Nibbana. (Nibbānapañhāsutta) Once when venerable Sāriputta was in Nālaka in Magadha the wanderer Jambukhadka approached him asked: "What is Nibbāna. Sariputta said that it was the destruction of lust, hatred and illusion (rāga, dosa moha). Asked what was the path to it he said that it was the Noble Eightfold Path.

[315] 2.Arahantship. (Arahattapañhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka what Arahantship was Sāriputta gave the same answer as in the previous sutta.

[316]3. Dhamma teacher. (Dhammavādīpañhasutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka who are the Dhamma preachers Sāriputta said that they were those who preached the abandoning of lust, hatred and illusion.

[317] 4. (sutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka for what purpose is the rightful life lived under Gotama Sāriputta said that it as the complete understanding of suffering and the way to it was the Noble Eightfold path.

[318] 5. Comfort. (Assāsappattasutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka how a man can reach a state of comfort Sāriputta said it was by understanding the arising, ceasing, satisfaction, misery and escape from the sixfold sense sphere and the way is the Noble Eightfold Path.

[319] 6. Supreme comfort. (Paramassāsappattasutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka how the supreme comfort could be won Sāriputta gave the same answer as in previous sutta.

[320] 7. Feeling. (Vedanāpañhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka what the feelings were Sāriputta said that they were of three kinds pleasant, painful and neutral. The y could be apprehended through the Noble Eightfold path.

[321] 8. Āsava. (sutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka what the intoxicants (Āsava) were Sāriputta said that there were three of them: sensuality, becoming and ignorance (kāma, bhava, avijjā) and that they could be eliminated by the Noble Eightfold Path.

[322] 9. Ignorance. (sutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka what ignorance is Sāriputta said that it was no understanding about ignorance its arising, ceasing and the way towards its ceasing.

[323] 10. Craving. (Taṇhāpñhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka about craving Sāriputta said that there were three kinds of craving: for sense delight, for becoming and for non-becoming.

[324] 11. Flood. (Oghapañhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka about the 'floods' Sāriputta said there four floods: sensuality, becoming, opinion and ignorance.

[325] 12. Grasping. (Upādānapañhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka about grasping Sāriputta said that they of four kinds: grasping after sensuality, after opinion, after rite and ritual, and after the theory of self.

[326] 13. Becoming. (Bhavapañhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka about suffering Sāriputta said that there were three such: becoming in the world of sense, in heaven of form, and in the formless heaven.

[327] 14. Suffering. (Dukkhapañhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka suffering Sāriputta said they were of three kinds: that caused nu pain, that caused by the activities, and that caused by the impermanence of things.

[328] 15. The own-body, (Sakkāyapañhāsutta) Asked by the Jambukhadaka about the 'own body' Sāriputta said that Buddha had taught that it consisted of four factors: the grasping body, the grasping feeling, the grasping perception, the grasping of the activities, and the grasping of consciousness.

[329] 16. That which is hard to do. (Dukkarapañhāsutta) Finally Jambukhadaka asked what was hard to accomplish in the discipline of the Buddha. Sāriputta gave a series of things to be done by a monk each one being the hardest to do after the previous ones had been done.
       It starts with the initial decision to "go forth" (i.e. become a bhikkhu). Then comes developing delight (in this profession). . Then comes the practice of what is in conformity with the Dhamma. Then after some time doing this the bhikkhu becomes an Arahant.

39. Sāmaṇḍaka Saṃyutta - 39 Collected Sayings about Sāmaṇḍaka

[330] 1. Samandaka. (Sāmaṇḍakasutta) Once when venerable Sāriputta was in Ukkacelaya in the Vajji territory on the Ganges. Then the wanderer Sāmaṇḍaka approached him asked: "What is Nibbāna. Sariputta said that it was the destruction of lust, hatred and illusion (rāga, dosa moha). Asked what was the path to it he said that it was the Noble Eightfold Path.

[331] 2. Hard to do. (Dukkarapañhāsutta) [Same as the last sutta [329] of the same name in the Jambukhādaka Samyutta.]

40. Moggallāna Saṃyutta - 40 Collected Sayings about Moggallāna

m[332] 1. The first jhāna. (Paṭhamajhānapañhāsutta) Once while staying at Sāvatthi venerable MahāMoggallāna addressed the monks: "Once while in meditation I reflected on the first trance (jhāna) which a monk aloof from sensuality and evil states attains and which is accompanied by thought directed and sustained, born of solitude. I attained this but when I emerged from it sensuality assailed my mind. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the first trance."

[333] 2. The second jhāna. (Dutiyajhānapañhāsutta) Then venerable MahāMmggallāna addressed the monks: "The second jhāna is achieved by a monk with calm thought directed inwards and is characterised by inward calm and one-pointedness of mind joy and happiness born of concentration. I attained this but when I emerged from it perception and mind connected with directed thought emerged. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the second trance."

[334] 3. The third jhāna. (Tatiyajhānapañhāsutta) Then venerable Mahāmoggallāna addressed the monks: "In the Third jhāna a monk by the fading of joy abides balanced and remains mindful and composed and experiences happiness with the body. I attained this but when I emerged from it perception and mind connected with joy emerged. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the third jhāna."

[335] 4. The fourth jhāna. (Catutthajhānapañhāsutta) Then venerable Mahāmoggallāna addressed the monks: "In the Fourth jhāna a monk by rejecting pleasure and pain and ending joy and sorrow enters the fourth jhāna which is free of pleasure and pain and is a state of balance and equanimity. I attained this but when I emerged from it perception and happiness of mind continued. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the fourth jhāna."

[336] 5. Space (Ākāsāñcāyatanapañhāsutta) Then venerable Mahāmoggallāna addressed the monks: "The monk going beyond the perception of objects, by ending the the perception of resistance, by not attending to perception of diversity, with the idea 'infinite is space', enters the realm of infinite space. But when I attained that state and I emerged from it perception and happiness of mind continued. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the the realm of the infinity of space."

[337] 6. Conciousness. (Viññāṇañcāyatanapañhāsutta) Then venerable Mahāmoggallāna addressed the monks: "A monk passing utterly beyond the realm of infinite space, with the idea: 'Endless is consciousness', enters on and abides in the realm of infinite consciousness. I achieved that state. But when I emerged from it perception connected with the realm of infinite space still continued. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the the realm of the infinity of consciousness and abide in it.

[338] 7. Nothingness. (Ākiñcaññāyatanapañhāsutta) Then venerable Mahāmoggallāna addressed the monks: "A monk passing utterly beyond the realm of of infinite consciousness, with the idea of 'there is nothing at all,' enters on and abides in the realm of nothingness. I achieved that state. But when I emerged from it perception connected with the realm of infinite space still continued. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the the realm of the infinity of consciousness and abide in it.

[339] 8. Neither perception nor non-perception. (Nevasaññānāsaññāuatanapañhāsutta) Then venerable Mahāmoggallāna addressed the monks: "A monk passing utterly beyond the realm of of nothingness enters the realm of neither-perception-nor-non-perception. I achieved that state. But when I emerged from it perception connected with the realm of nothingness still continued. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the the realm of neither-perception-nor-non-perception. and abide in it.

[340] 9. The unconditioned. (Animittapañhāsutta) Then venerable Mahāmoggallāna addressed the monks: "A monk paying no attention to any or all distinguishing marks, enters on and abides in that rapture of mind which is without conditions 'the unconditioned rapture of the mind'. I achieved that state. But when I emerged from it concioussness followd by distinguishing marks continued to appear. But the Buddha came to me through his supernormal powers and urged me to continue, and I did so and was able to abide in the unconditioned rapture of the mind.

[341] 10. Sakka. (Sakkasutta) Once when venerable Mahāmoggallana was staying at the Veluvana in Sāvatthi he (by using his supernormal powers) vanished from the Veluvana and appeared in the Heaven of the Thirty-three.
       (1) Then Sakka King of the Devas came with 500 devas and Mahāmoggallāna said to them : "It is good to take refuge in the Buddha, the Dhamma and the Sangha as by doing so one can be born in the deva world after death". Then Sakka came with more devas and the same message was given to them.
       (2) For the second time Sakka came to Mahāmoggallāna with 300 devas and the same message was given but this time Mahamogallana instructed the devas of the gātha of wroshp of the Buddha: "iti pi so bhagavā arahaṃ sammā sambuddho vijj9caranasampanno sugato lokavidū anuttaro purisadammasāsatthā devamanussānaṃ buddho bhagavā". He then instruicted them in the gāthas of worship of the Dhamma and of the Order of the sangha. He said that those who took refuge in this manner were assured of a bith in the heavenly world. Then Salla came with more devas to hear the same instruction.
       (3) For the third time Sakka came wot the dervas and th4e same discourse was given by Mhāmoggallāna. This time Sakka repe4ated what the monk had said.
       (4) For the fourth time Sakka came with the monks and the same discourse was given to them.

[342] 11. Candana. (Candanasutta) While Mahāmoggallāna was still in the deva world Candana, the son of a deva and other sons of devas came to him and he repeated to them the same instruction that taking refuge in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha assures rebirth in the deva world.

41. Citta Saṃyutta - 41 Collected Sayings about Citta

[343] 1. Fetters. (Saṃyojanasutta). Once a number of elder monks were living at Macchikasanda near Sāvatthi when in their discussion after their midday meal the question arose: "Fetters (saṃyojanā) bind things up but are two things so tied up different in spirit and in letter, or are they the same in spirit and different in letter ?". Different views on this were expressed. Then Citta the house-father who had come near the monks enquired what was being discussed. On being told he offered a parable. He said that if black bull and a white bull were tied together with a rope it is not correct to say that one bull was the same as the other. Only the rope that ties them is the fetter. Similarly mind is not a fetter to mind-states, nor vice-versa, but the desire and lust that arise owing to both is the fetter.' This explanation pleased the monks.

[344] 2. Isidatta 1.(Paṭhamaisidattasutta). This time Citta the house-father visited the monks at Macchikasanda and invited them for a meal the next day. When they arrived at his house the next day Citta asked them: "The Buddha has spoken of diversity of elements (dhātinānatta). How far on this has he spoken ?". The elder monks were silent even though asked twice but Isidatta a junior monk asked permission to speak and said: "The Buddha has said that the diversity of elements consists of the elements of eye, of body, of eye-consciousness, and so forth up to the elements of mind, of mind-states and of mind-consciousness." . This explanatiohn pleased Citta, and he proceeded to serve food to the monks. After the meal the mopks went and the chief monk told Isidatta that in th4e future too if such a questioh arises he could answer it.

[345] 3. Isidatta 2. (Dutiyaissidattasutta). This time too Citta the house-father invited the monks at Macchikasanda for a meal the next day. When they arrived at his house the next day Citta asked them: "As to views like is the world eternal and finite, is life (jīva) and body the same or different, what happens to the Tathāgata after death, and the sixty-two views set out in the Brahmjāla – why do these views prevail and why do they not prevail ?". The chief monk did not answer even though asked three times. Then Isidatta replied: "These views arise owing to the own-body belief (sakkāyadiṭṭhi). If there is no such belief such views will not arise". Then asked what causes the own-body view Isidatta said: "That belief arises to those not instructed in the Ariyan doctrine and regard the body as the self (atta), self as having body; so also with regard to feeling, perception, the activities and consciousness. The well instruted Arian has no such views and there does not belive in the own-body." This explanation poleased Citta who sever th4e meal to the monks.

[346] 4. Miracle of Mahaka. (Mahakapāṭihāriyasutta). Once again Citta the house-father invited the monks for a meal the next day. When they came they were served with milk-rice and after the meal they went away followed by Citta. That day was very hot and soon the group was sweating profusely. Then venerable Mahaka the most junior monk said to the Chief monk that it were good if there was a cool breeze and rain. The chief monk ageed and Mahaka by his magic power caused a cool breeze to blow and light rain to fall. Citta was surprised that the most junior monk could have such magical power. Soon the group came to their destination and dispersed to their respecive lodgings.
       Then Citta went to the lodging of Mahaka and asked that he be shown a miracle of magic. Then hMahaka asked Citta to lay down his cloak and scatter some grass on it and he went inside his room. He then caused by magic a fire to emerge from the keyhole and set the grass on fire. Citta was astounded and doused the flame with his cloak, and when Mahaka came out Citta thanked him and went away. Then Mahaka put his lodging in order and taking his bowl left Macchikasanda and was not seen again.

[347] 5. Kāmabhu 1. (Paṭhamakāmabhusutta). Once venerable Kāmabhu was visiting Macchikasanda. The house-father Citta visited him and Kāmabhu recited this verse to him: "Nelaṅgo setapacchādo, ekāro vattatī ratho; Anīghaṃ passa āyantaṃ, chinnasotaṃ abandhana" [A chariot with faultess parts, a white hood and one wheel comes rolling along carrying one who is sin-less, a stream-cutter and bond free]. Citta ascertained that it was a verse uttereed by the Buddha. He was then asked to explain. After some refletion he said: "The 'chariot' is the body, 'faultless parts' are virtues, 'white hood' is release, 'one wheel' is mindfulness, 'rolling on' is coming and going, 'he who is carried' is the Arahant, 'sin-less' is one who has has destroyed the āsavas, 'stream-cutter' is one who had destroyed the stream of saṃsāra, and 'bond free' is one who has destroyed lust, hatred and delusion. Thus must this saying be understfood ". Then Citta was praised as one who had understood the Buddha's dhamma.

[348] 6. Kāmabhu 2. (Dutiyakāmabhūsutta). On another occasion the house-father Citta came to visit venerable Kāmabhu who was staying at Macchikasanda and asked him how many activities (saṅkhāarā) were there. Kāmabhu answered three activities (body, speech and mind), and proceeded to explain what each of these were. Bodily activity is breathing in-and-out, speech ativity is directed and sustained thought, and mind activity is perception and feeling. K#257;mabhu then explained how a monk could cease from these activites. He said that the states most conducive for the ceasing from the activities are calm (samata)and insight (vipassanā).

[349] 7. Godatta. (Godattasutta). Once venerable Godatta was visiting Macchikasanda. The house-father Citta visited him and Godatta asked Citta a question: "There are four ways of liberating the mind (cetovimutti): limitless release, unwordly release, release by the void, and signless release. Are these four the same in letter and spirit or are they different? ".
       Citta answered that in the case of limitless release of mind a monk suffuses the six directions first with a mind full of loving-kindness, then of compassion, then of sympathy, and finally of equanimity. In the case of unworldly release the monk goes beyond the sphere of infinite consicousness and resides in the sphere of nothingness. In the case of release by the void the monk realises that void is this of the self and of things that belong to the self. In the case of sign-less release the monk regards everything as being without sign and abides in a sign-less tranquil state. All these four states are states which differ in letter and spirit.
       In the case that the four states are the same in letter and spirit the monk has abandoned lust, hate and illusion. He has destroyed the āsavas. In this liberation of mind there is no distinction between the four states, they a all the same.

[350] 8. Nigantha. (NigaṇNigaṇṭhanāṭaputtasutta). Once Nigantha Nāthaputta (the Jain leader) with a large following came to Macchikasanda and Citta with his supporters visited him. Then Nigantha asked Citta: "Do you believe in Gotama's teaching that there is a mental balance without directed and sustained thought, and that there is a ceasing of such thought ?". Citta replied that he does not go in faith with these teachings. At this Nigantha was pleased and told his followers the Citta was guileless and wise. But Citta continued that when he has gone through the four jhānas he realized that there is a mental balance without directed and sustained thought, and that there is a ceasing of such thought. This did not please Nigantha who told his followers that Citta was crooked and crafty. Then Citta asked Nigantha ten questions relating to the true Dhamma [these questions are not given in the sutta]. Nigantha could not answer them. Then Citta got up from his seat and went away.

[351] 9. The unclothed wanderer Kasapa. (Acelakassapasutta) . Once the unclothed ascetic Kassapa came to Macchikasanda and Citta went to see him. On questioning Kassapa said that had been an ascetic for thirty years but has not had any superhuman experience. Kassapa then asked Citta the same questions. Citta said that he had been an Ariyan disciple for thirty years and that during that period he had gone through the four jhānas. He said the Buddha would have said of him: "Citta is not bound by any fetter that would make him come back again to this world". Kassapa was so impressed that a house-father in white garments should have such superhuman experience and he wanted to be ordained. So Citta took Kassapa to an elder monk who ordained Kassaps in the Buddha's Dhamma-discipline. Then not a long time after living solitary, secluded, zealous, ardent and aspiring Kssapa became an Arahant.

[352] 10. On the death-bed. (Gilānadassanasutta) . When Citta had become sick afflicted with a sore disease the earth-based devas came to him and said : "Aspire that in a future time you become a ruler or a universal monarch." But Citta told them: "That is something impermanent and must be left behind". But his relations and friends who were around him (and perhaps did not see the earth-based devas) told Citta: "Be mindful do not talk at random". Citta said that he was addressing the devas who knowing that he was a good person wished him well and told him to aspire to be a ruler, and what they had heard was his reply. Then the relations and friends asked that they be instructed.
       Then Citta instructed them to have faith in the Buddha by reciting the stanza: "He is the Exalted One, the Arahant ..." (itipi so bhagavā arahaṃ...) . Then they should have faith in the Dhamma by reciting the stanza: "Well proclaimed by the Exalted One is the Dhamma ..." (svākkhāto bhagavato dhammo ...). Then they should have faith in the Sangha by reciting the stanza: "Walking righteously is the Exalted One's Order of Disciples ...." (suppaṭipanno bhagavato sāvakasaṅgho...). Then he said: "All offerings made by you should also be offered without favour to righteous ones of a good nature." So after he had thus inspired his relations and friends Citta passed away.

42. Gāmanṇ Saṃyutta - 42. Collected Sayings about Headmen

[353] 1. Caṇḍa. (Caṇḍasutta). Once when the Buddha was at Sāvatthi the headman Caṇḍa came to him and asked why are some people called "fierce" (caṇḍa) and others "kindly" (sorata) ?. The Buddha said that a person who has not abandoned passion (rāga) and is angry when others harass him is called 'fierce'. Those who have abandoned passion and are not angry wen others harass them are called 'kindly.

[354] 2. Tālaputta. (Tālaputtasutta). Once when the Buddha was at Veluvana in Rajagaha a dance leader called Tālaputta came to him and asked what his view was of the old saying that actors who delight people by false pretences are after death born as "laughing devas". After first refusing to answer this the Buddha finally said that such actors are not free of lust, resentment and illusion and so being drugged and slothful make others also drugged and slothful. After death they are born in the hell of laughter. Then Tālaputta began to cry and the Buddha said that is why he had first refused to answer his question. Tālaputta then said that he had cried because for long he had been deceived by teachers who had said that they after death become laughing devas. He then thanked the Buddha for shedding light on this matter.

[355] 3. The fighter. (Yodhājīvasutta). The headman Yodhājīva came to the Buddha asked him for this opinion on the view that a warrior who in battle exerts himself and thereby suffers and is killed by others, then, when body breaks up, after death he is reborn in the heaven of passionate devas (parajitā devā). After first refusing to answer this the Buddha finally said that such persons were reborn in hell or as an animal. Then Yodhājīva began to cry and the Buddha said that is why he had first refused to answer his request. Yodhājīva then said that he had cried because for long he had been deceived by teachers who had said that they become devas. He then thanked the Buddha for shedding light on this matter.

[356] 4. The Mahout.. (Hattātohaasutta). [Same as the previous sutta with the fighter headman replaced by the mahout headman.]

[357] 5. The jockey. (Assārohasutta). [Same as the sutta [255] with the fighter headman replaced by the jockey headman.]

[358] 6. Asibhandakaputta. (Asibhandakaputtasutta). Once when the Buddha was at Nālanda the headman Asibhandakaputta came to him and said: "Certain brahmins when a man dies carries his body calling out his name thinking that this will hasten him to heaven. What does the Buddha think of this?". The Buddha said: "When a wicked man who violates all the precepts dies and people pray that he go to heaven he will not go to heaven. If a man put a heavy stone into a deep pool and others pray that it come up it will not happen. Similarly a man who kills, steals, is a wrong-doer in respect to sensual passion, is a liar, a backbiter, is of bitter speech, and has perverted views he will be born in Hell even though the multitude pray that he go to heaven. On the other hand a person who is the opposite of this wicked man dies he will be reborn in the heavenly world. The headman was pleased at this answer.

[359] 7. Field. (Khettupamasutta). Once when the Buddha was at Nālanda the headman Asibhandakaputta came to him and asked: "Why is it that you preach the Dhamma in full to some and only in part to others ?". The Buddha asked a question in return: " Suppose a farmer has three fields one with excellent soil, the second with poorer soil, and the third with the poorest soil. Which would he sow first ?" Asibhandakaputta said the field with the best soil will be the first and then the others. The Buddha then said that the ordained bhikkhus are the best of is disciples and to them he teaches the Dhamma in full. Next comes the other categories and he teaches them those parts of the Dhamma that are appropriate for them. Another analogy he gave was three water pots one perfect and the other two with cracks. To store water the perfect pot will be used first. Asibhandakaputta was please with this explanation and asked to be considered a lay disciple of the Buddha.

[360] 8. The conch. (Saṅkadhammasutta). Once when the Buddha was at Nālanda the headman Asibhandakaputta who was a follower of Nigaṇṭha Nāṭaputta came to him. The Buddha then asked him: "How does Nigaṇṭha teach his doctrine for his followers ? ". Asibhandakaputta answered as follows: "Nighanta teaches that anyone who kills a living being, or steals, or acts wrongfully in passion, or lies goes to hell. According as a person acts (habitually) so is his destiny (yaṃbahulayaṃ yaṃbahulayaṃ viharati, tena tena nīyatī)". The Buddha took this to mean that a man may not habitually kill but might do so occasionally but as he is not a habitual killer he will no go to hell. So also for the other moral violations. But a Tathāgata censures all violations of the moral code and extends boundless loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity all round. This is like a conch blower who blows his conch in all directions. This satisfied Asibhandakaputta who asked again to be considered a lay disciple of the Buddha.

[361] 9. The clan. (Kulasutta). Once when there was a famine in Nalanda Nigaṇṭha Nāṭaputta asked Asibhandakaputta, who was then his disciple, to confront the Buddha with a trick question. This was to ask the Buddha if he had compassion for clansmen (householders) and if he said that he had compassion for then then to ask how he can beg food from them in this time of famine. Asibhandakaputta did as he was instructed and asked the question of the Buddha. The Buddha said: "In ninety-one kalpas I have not wronged a clansman even for a cooked meal. I go only to clansmen who are exceedingly rich, who have amassed their wealth honestly and with restraint. There are eight causes of injury to clans. These are from kings, from robbers, from fire, from water, form the impermanence of things, from not finding hidden treasure, and lastly from those among them who waste the wealth of the clan. This pleased the headman who asked again to be considered a lay disciple of the Buddha.

[362] 10. The crown jewel. (Maṇicūḷakasutta). Once in the royal palace at Rajagaha the question arose whether the monk followers of the Buddha were allowed to accept gold and silver. Then a jeweller headman said that monks were not permitted accept gold and silver. But he could not convince the others, so he went to see the Buddha and asked him. The Buddha confirmed that the monks in his dispensation were not allowed to accept gold and silver for to do so would lead to the five sensual delights. However grass, firewood, a vehicle or a servant could be accepted by those who had a need for them.

[363] 11. Bhadraka. (Bhadrakasutta). Once when the Buddha was staying at Uruvelakappa in the Malla territory the headman Bhadraka came to him and asked him to explain the arising and ending of suffering. The Buddha said that before teaching the arising and ending of suffering in the past or in the future he would first consider it as of now. He then asked Bhadraka if there were people whose death or imprisonment would sadden him and others he would not care about. Bhadraka answered affirmatively for both. Asked the reason for this he said that in one case he had desire and longing for those involved but not in the other case. The Buddha then said: "All suffering is rooted in desire. This is also the case with past and future suffering".
       Then Bhadraka said his son Chiravasi was living elsewhere and every morning he send someone to find how he was faring. Then the Buddha asked if the news about Ciravasi was that he had been killed or imprisoned if that would bring sorrow, grief, lamentation and despair to him. Bhadraks said he would be sorely affected. The same would be case if these things would befall Cirasi's mother. This he said was because of his desire and longing for his son and his wife. The Buddha then said that he should understand: "Whatsoever suffering arises in me all that is rooted in desire, is joined to desire. Desire is indeed the root of Ill".

[364] 12. Rāsiya. (Rāsiyasutta). The headman Rāsiya came to the Buddha and said: "People say that Gotama the recluse censures all ascetic ways, that he scolds and abuses any ascetic who lives a rough life.". He wanted to know if this was in accordance with the Buddha's teaching. The Buddha said it was not in accordance accordance with his teaching and was a misrepresentation of his teaching. Then the Buddha said this about his teaching.
  1. There are two extremes to be avoided by one who has gone forth: devotion to pleasure and devotion to self-mortification. Avoiding these he takes the Middle Path which is the Ariyan Eightfold path.
  2. There are three kinds of people given to sensual pleasure. (i) those seeking wealth by violence but gets no pleasure. (ii) those seeking wealth with and without violence, but gets no pleasure. (iii) those seeking wealth by lawful means without violence and gets no pleasure. (iv) those seeking wealth lawfully without violence, but gets no pleasure. (iv) those seeking wealth lawfully without violence and gets pleasure.
  3. In seeking wealth there are blameworthy and praiseworthy aspects. The blamewothy aspects are getting wealth unlawfully and with violence, not getting any satisfaction from the wealth secured, not sharing the wealth, and not engaging in meritorious deeds. The praiseworthy ones are the opposite of these blameworthy ones. These blameworth and praiseworthy acts are combing various ways in the different kinds of wealth getting mentined in the previous section.
  4. There are three kinds of ascetics: (i) one who goes forth hoping to reach a profitable state, get knowledge and insight an have some superhuman experiece. He tortures himself but gets none of these. (ii) One who tortures himself and manages to get into some profitable state but has no superhuman experience. (iii)This ascetic tortures himself and reaches a profitable sate and has some superhuman experience.
  5. These ascetic paractices have some blameworthy and some praiseworthy aspects. The blamewrothy aspects are torturing oneself, not reaching any profitable state and not gaining insight and knowledge. The praiseworthy aspects are the opposites of these blameworthy ones. The three kinds of ascetics combine these in various ways.
  6. In this life there are three things that do not decay, are timeless, can be experienced, that lead to Nibbāna and which the wise can reach. These are to abandon thoughts of harming, to abandon depravity, and to abandon delusion.
[365] 13. Pāṭali. (Pāṭalisutta). Once when the Buddha was staying at Uttara in the country of the Koliyans the headman Pāṭaliya came to him and asked: "I have heard it said that the recluse Gotama knows magic. Is this true?". The Buddha said that it was true. Then Pāṭali said that those had said so had implied that the Buddha was a trickster. Then the following conversation took place:
  1. The Buddha asked Pāṭali: "There are Koliyans who ae hired to do various jobs who are rogues. Does that mean that you as a Koliyan is also a rogue ?". Pāṭali said: "No". The Buddha then said: "Similarly although there are tricksters the Tathāgatas are not tricksters. I am not a trickster. The real tricksters after death are born in hell. So also are those who take life and violate the other precepts."
  2. The Buddha said: "There are some recluses who say that anyone who takes life suffers in this very life. But a person who kills the enemy of a king is garlanded and praised. The saying of the recluse is false." [Other instances of people punished or rewarded contrary to the saying of the recluse are cited.]
  3. The headman then said: "I have a rest house with four rooms. Once four teachers with contrary views occupied them. One said that deeds good or bad had no fruit or consequence. Another said that all deeds had good or bad fruits. Another said that if one kills another, or steals no evil come to him. Another said that even if a person causes genocide no evil will come him. I was perplexed at these teachings."
  4. In response to the above the Buddha said: "You will get mental calm if you follow the teaching of the Dhamma". He then described the conduct of the Ariyan disciple.

      43. Asaṅkhata Saṃyutta - 43. Collected Sayings about the Uncompounded

      1. Paṭhamavaggo - 1. First Section

      [366] 1. The body. (Kāyagatāsatisutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach the Uncompunded and the way to it. The Uncompounded is the destruction of lust, hatred and illusion. The path to the Uncompounded is Mindfulness relating to body. 2 That, brethren, is called ' the path that goes to the Uncompounded. I have done what should be done by a teacher that seeks the welfare of his disciples, in compassion, feeling compassion. Here are the roots of trees, here are empty places. Do you meditate. Be not remiss. Be not remorseful hereafter.".

      [367] 2. Calm. (Samatavipassanāsutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is the destruction of lust. The path to it is calm and insight."

      [368] 3. Directed thought. (Savitkkasavicārasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is directed thought. The path to it is concentration with direted and sustained thought."

      [369] 4. Emptyness, (sutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is emptyness. The path to it is concentration that is void, signless and aimless. "

      [370] 5. Mindfulness, (sutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is stations of mindfulness. The path to it is the four stations of minflness. "

      [371] 6. Right effort(Sammappadhānasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is right effort. The path to it is the four best efforts.

      [372] 7. Effective power. (Iddhipādasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is the bases of effecive power. The path to it is the four bases of effective power. "

      [373] 8. Controlling power. (Indriyasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is the controlling power. The path to it is the five conrolling powers. "

      [374] 9. Strength. Balasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is strength. The path to it is the five strengths. "

      [375] 10. Limbs of wisdom.(Bohhaṅgasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded are the limbs of wisdom The path to it are seven limbs of wisdom."

      [376] 11. The path. (Maggṅgasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "The Uncompounded is the path. The path to it is the Ariyan Eightfold Path. I have done what should be done by a teacher that seeks the welfare of his disciples, in compassion, feeling compassion. Here are the roots of trees, here are empty places. Do you meditate. Be not remiss. Be not remorseful hereafter.".

      2. Dutiyavaggo - . Second Section

      The second section of this Saṃyutta (Collection) is largely a restatement of the suttas in the first section. The text in the Sixth Recitation divides them into 32 text segments [377-409] but these in turn gathered intol 3 segments [377], [378] and [379-409].

      [377] 1. Calm (Asaṅkhatasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach you the Uncompounded and the path that goes to the Uncompounded. The Uncompounded is the destruction of lust, hate and delusion. The path to it is calm.

      [378] 2. The end. (Antasutta). The Buddha addressed the monks: "I will teach you the the end and the path to the end. Do listen to it" . [The Here follows the text in the next section ].

      [379-409] 3. The path to the end. (Antāsavādisutta). Addressing the monks the monks the Buddha said that the path to the end consists of the following steps:
      • Calm and Insight. Herein a monk develops mindfulness of the body. and the destruction of lust, hatred and illusion.
      • The sixfold concentration. Herein a monk abides in concentration together with thought directed and sustained, then without thought directed and sustained but with thought sustained only, then without thought either directed or sustained, that is empty, that is sign-less, and that is aimless.
      • The four stations of mindfulness. Herein a monk abides in contemplating body in body, ardent, self-possessed, mindful, by restraining the coveting and dejection that are in the world.
      • The four best efforts. Herein a monk originates desire that evil, unprofitable states not yet arisen shall not arise. He strives, puts forth energy, exerts his mind and strives. He originates desire that evil, unprofitable states that have arisen shall be abandoned. He originates desire that good, profitable states not yet arisen shall arise. He originates desire that good, profitable states that have arisen shall be established, shall not be confused, shall be made better, grow to increase, be practised and fulfilled.
      • The four bases of effective power. Herein a monk practises the basis of effective power which is attended by concentration and effort, compounded with desire, compounded with energy, with idea, with investigation.
      • The five faculties. Herein a monk practises the faculty of faith, which is founded on singleness of mind, heart, founded on dispassion, on cessation, which leads to giving up. He practises the faculty of energy, the faculty of mindfulness, the faculty of concentration, the faculty of wisdom, which is founded on singleness of mind, founded on dispassion, on cessation, which leads to giving up.
      • The five powers. Herein a monk practises the power of faith, which is founded on singleness of mind, heart. He practises the power of energy. He practises the power of mindfulness. etc.
      • The seven factors of wisdom. Herein a monk practises the factor of wisdom which is mindfulness. He practises the factor of wisdom which is investigation of the Norm. He practises the factor of wisdom which is energy which is zest, calm and concentration. He practises the factor of wisdom which is disinterestedness, which is founded on singleness of mind, founded on dispassion, on cessation which leads to giving up.
      • The Ariyan eightfold path. Herein a monk practises right view, right aim, right speech, right action, right living, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.
         
      The Buddha concluded: "This, brethren, is called the path that goes to the Uncompounded. Thus have I taught you the Uncompounded and the path that goes to the Uncompounded. Whatever should be done by a teacher who seeks the welfare of his disciples, in compassion have I done that for you. Here are the roots of trees. Here are empty places. Do you meditate. Be not remiss. Be not remorseful hereafter. This is our instruction to you."

      44. Abyākata Saṃyutta - 43. Collected Sayings about the Unrevealed

      [410] 1. Khemā. (Khemāsutta). Once the bhikkhuni Khemā was staying at Toranavatthu between Sāvatthi and Saketa. Then King Pasanedi of Kosala on his way to Sāvatthi stopped for a day at Toranavatthu. He sent a man to find out if there was a recluse with whom he could have discourse. The man returned and told the king that the only recluse he could find was Khemā. So he visited her and asked her a series of questions. He asked her if the Tathāgata exists after death, or not exist, or both exist and not exist, or neither exist nor not-exist. To all these bhikkhuni stated that it was not revealed by the Buddha. When asked the reason for this the bhikkhuni asked a counter-question: Does the King have an accountant who can count the grains of sand in the Ganges or the amount of water in the ocean. The King said that these could not be done. Then the bhikkhuni said that the Buddha's body, feeling, perception, activity and consciousness were boundless and could not be calculated. So the questions asked by the King cannot be answered. When the King returned to Savatthi he went to the Buddha and asked the same questions and got the same answer. Then he said that it was wonderful that both the Teacher and the disciple gave the same answer, and left.

      [411] 2. Anurādha. (Anur#257;dhasutta). Once the Buddha was staying at Vesāli and venerable Anurādha was staying at a forest hut nearby. Then some wanderers approached Anurādha and asked him the same four questions on the existence of the Tathāgata aftere death given in the previous sutta. Anurādha said thhat the Buddha has not spoken in any of these four ways. Whereupon the wanderers abused the monk calling him a novice and ignorant and left. After this Anurādha went to the Buddha and related the who incident. The Buddha first tested his knowledge of the Dhamma by making him````` assert that the body is impermanent, full of suffering, and that it cannot be regarded as 'This is mine, I am this and this is not my self'. Then the Buddha asked Anurādha If he regarded the Tathāgata's body, feeling, perception, activities and conciousness as the Tathāgata. On his saying "No", the Buddha said that in life a Tatāgata is not met with, so how can he be met with after death. Anurādha agreed and the Buddha said that he only proclaims sufering and the ceasing of suffering.

      [412] 3. Sāriputta and Koṭṭhika 1. (Paṭhamasāriputtakoṭṭhikasutta). Venerables Sāriputta and Mahākoṭṭhika were staying at Isipatana near Benares when Mahākoṭṭhika asked Sāriputts the same questions about the existence of the Tathāgata after death and the Buddha's refusal to answer. Sāriputta said that to ask those question was to view the Tathāgata as body, feeling, perception, activity and consciousness (which a wrong view).

      [413] 4. Sāriputta and Koṭṭhika 2. (Dutiyasāriputtakoṭṭhikasutta). The same conversation as in the previous sutta takes place but this time Sāriputta says that the questions arise because of not knowing the body and the other components as they really are.

      [414] 5. Sāriputta and Koṭṭhika 3. (Tatiyasāriputtakoṭṭhikasuttasutta). The same conversation as sutta [412] takes place but this time Sāriputta says that the questions arise because one has not abandoned passion, desire, affection, thirst, feverish longing, and craving for the body and the other constituents of personality.

      [415] 6. Sāriputta and Koṭṭhika 4.(Catuttasāriputtakoṭṭhikasuttasuttasutta). Same as the previous sutta except it is added that after craving is abandoned there is nothing more to consider.

      [416] 7. Moggallāna. Moggallānasutta). Here the wanderer Vaccagotta visits Mahāmoggallāna and questions him about the world (is it eternal or not, is it finite or not), life and the body (are they the same or different) and the Tathāgata (does he exist after death). Mahāmoggallāna said that the Buddha had not revealed these things. Then Vacca went to the Buddha and asked why he unlike other teachers did not answer these questions. Then the Buddha said "Other wanderers regard the eye and other organs of sense thus: 'They are mine, I am them, they are my self'. That is why, when questioned they give various replies. But the Tathāgatas are fully enlightened Arahants. They do not so regard the organs of sense. Therefore when questioned on these matters I do not reply." Vaccagotta was pleased at this answer.

      [417] 8. Vaccagotta. (Vaccagottasutta). Here Vaccagotta on his own visits the Buddha and the asks the same questions as in the previous sutta. The Buddha gives the same answer and Vacca is pleased.

      [418] 9. Debating Hall, (Kutūhalesutta). The wanderer Vaccagotta approached the Buddha and said: "In the Debating Hall recently many renowned teachers like Purana Kassapa, Makkhali Gosala, Niganṭa Nātaputta, Sañjaya, Kaccayana, and Ajita engaged in a discussion. Each one said that they could say where their deceased disciples were reborn in great detail. I have doubts about how master Gotama will deal with this question."
             The Buddha then said: "You may doubt and waver on this doubtful point. As to rebirth, I declare it to be for what has fuel, not for what is without fuel.  Just as a fire does not blaze without fuel, even so rebirth to be is for what has fuel, not for what is without fuel." Asked further what the fuel is when a person dies the Buddha declared that it was craving.

      [419] 10. Ananda (Anandasutta). Once Vaccagotta the Wanderer approached the Buddha and asked: "Is there a self (atta)" ? The Buddha was silent. Then he asked: "Is there not a self"? Again the Buddha was silent. Then Vacca departed. Then venerable Ananda asked the Buddha why he had been silent. The Buddha said that as to the first question if he had answered "Yes" he would have been an eternalist, if he had answered "No" he would have been an annihilationist. As to the second question if he had answered "No" he would have been an eternalist, if he had answered "Yes" he would have been an annihilationist. These answers would be in keeping with his doctrine of no-self.

      [420] 11. Sabhiya (Sabhiyakaccānasutta). Once the venerable Sabhiya (also called Kaccāna after his tribe) was staying at ñātika. Then the wanderer Vaccagotta came to him and asked him about the existence of the Tathāgata after death, giving the four logical possibilities. Sabhiya said that this was not revealed by the Buddha. Then Vacca asked him why the Buddha had not revealed this. Then Sabhiya replied: "All the grounds for describing a person as embodied or disembodied, as conscious or unconscious, as neither conscious nor unconscious, such grounds cease in every way, entirely, wholly, utterly and without remainder, in the case of the Tathāgata. So those questions cannot be answered with respect to a Tathāgata." Then Vacca after finding out that Sabhiya had been a monk for only three years said that it is indeed a great thing for one to know such abstruse things in so short a time."