Saṃyutta Nikāya– Book of Kindred Sayings

5. Mahāvagga – 5. The great Chapter

46. Bojjhaṅgasaṃyutta – 46. Sayings on the Limbs of Wisdom

1. Pabbatavagga – The Mountain

[182] 1. Himalaya. (Himavantasutta) The Buddha said: "Just as snakes get strength and growth when supported by Himalaya mountains, streams and the ocean so a monk wins greatness and growth when supported by virtue; he cultivates the seven limbs of wisdom which are mindfulness (sati) , investigation of Dhamma (dhammavicaya), energy (vīriya), rupture (pīti), tranquillity (passadda) , concentration, (samādhi), and equanimity (upekkhā).

[183] 2. Body. (Kāyasutta) The Buddha said: "Just as the body is supported by material food so are the five hindrances supported by their own food. (i) The food for sensuous desire is the appealing nature of things. (ii) ill-will is fed by the repulsive nature of things. (iii) sloth and torpor has as its food regret, drowsiness, languor, over-eating, and turpidity of mind. (iv) Restlessness and scruple is fed by the non-tranquillity of mind. (v) Sceptical doubt is fed by things that are doubtful."
       He continued: "The seven limbs of enlightenment also have their own food. (i) The food for the mindfulness limb are things that conduce to contemplation; (ii) that for investigation are things good and bad; (iii) that for energy are effort, exertion and striving; (iv) that for joy are things that conduce to joy; (v) that for tranquillity are things that lead to tranquillity of body and mind; (vi) that for concentrating are things that calm and do not confuse; and (vii) that for equanimity are things that conduce to balance of mind. "

[184] 3. Virtue. (Sīlasutta) The Buddha said: "The very sight of virtuous monk with concentration and insight is of great help (bahūpakāra); Such a monk would be cultivating the seven limbs of wisdom. Anyone doing so can expect seven fruits or advantages: (i) He obtains realization immediately; (ii) if not he does so at the time of his death; (iii) if not because he has done away with the five lower fetters he will do so in the future; (iv) if not he will reduce his allotted time (in saṃsāra); (v) if not he will be able to reach realization with little difficulty; (vi) if not he will do so with some difficulty; (vii) or if none of the above he will be reborn in the pure abodes."

[185] 4. Practice. (Vatthasutta) Once in Sāvatthi the venerable Sāriputta addressed the monks: "In whatever time of the day I can abide in any of the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness, or Dhamma-investigation, or energy, or zest, or tranquillity, or equanimity). It is just like a king or noble who has a wardrobe of many different suits and he can wear any of them at any time of the day that he wishes."

[186] 5. The monk. (Bhikkhusutta) Once a certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How far is the name 'wisdom limb' applicable?" The Buddha answered: "A monk can win wisdom through its practice. That is why it is so called. Once a monk cultivates these limbs his mind is rid of lust, of becoming and of ignorance. Then the knowledge comes: 'I am free, done is the task, there is no more of being here for me' ".

[187] 6. Kuṇḍaliya. (Kuṇḍaliyasutta) In Sāketa the wanderer Kuṇḍaliya came to the Buddha and asked him why Gotama was living the way he does. In an interactive discussion with the Kuṇḍaliya the Buddha gave an account of the way he lives, the reasons for it, and how a monk can achieve it. The following is a summary of what the Buddha said:
       "A Tathāgata lives enjoying the fruits of the release by knowledge (vijjāvimutti). The conditions for such release are the seven limbs of wisdom. To cultivate these one begins with the four stations of mindfulness. This is followed by virtuous habits which involve the control of the sense faculties. On seeing an object with the eye the monk does not develop desire and hankering for it if it is pleasant, nor is he depressed and resentful if it is repulsive. The same is applied for objects sensed by the ear, the nose, the tongue, the body and the mind. In all situations the body and mind are unmoved. The seven limbs of wisdom complete the release by knowledge." This pleased Kuṇḍaliya who goes for refuge in the Buddha the Dhamma and the sangha.

[188] 7. The peaked house. (Kūṭāgārasutta) The Buddha said: "Just as in a peaked house all the rafters are joined at the peak and slope downwards so also the monk who cultivates the seven limbs of wisdom slopes towards Nibbāna.

[189] 8. Upavana (sutta) Once when venerables Sāriputta and Upavāna were staying at Kosambi. Then Sāriputta asked Upavāna: "Can a monk by attention know the seven limbs of wisdom ?" Upavāna answered: "He can. He starts the mindfulness limb with the resolve 'My mind is well released. Sloth and torpor and excitement and flurry restrained. I have resolute energy. In this way I make this limb of wisdom mine'. In the same way the other limbs of wisdom are achieved. Thus a monk could establish the seven wings of wisdom by systematic attention to them, thereby conducing to pleasant living."

[190] 9. Arising 1. (Paṭamauppannasutta) The Buddha said: "If the seven limbs of wisdom have not arisen it can arise but only with the emergence of a Tathāgata, an Arahant fully enlightened."

[191] 10. Arising 2. (Dutiyauppannasutta) The same as the previous sutta but with 'a Tathāgata' is replaced by 'the Sugata (Happy One)'.

2. Gilānavagga – 2. The sick man

[192] 1. Living beings. (Panāsuttasutta) The Buddha said: "Just s all living beings live with the support opf the earth so a cultivates the seven limbs of wisdom supported by virtue. "

[193] 2.Simile of the sun 1. (Paṭhmasūriyyūpamasutta) The Buddha said: "Just as the dawn is the harbringer of the sunrise so a sincere friend is the start of the cultivation of the seven limbs of wisdom (minfulness to equanimity). "

[194] 3. Simile f the sun 2. (Dutiyasūriyūpamasutta) Same as the previous sutta.

[195] 4. Sick monk 1. (Paṭhmagilānasutta) Once when the Buddha was at veluvana in Rajagaha the venerable Mahākassapa was lying sick in an abode close by. The Buddhat to see the sick monk and enquired if he was bearing sup. Kassapa said: "No, there is no sign of the pain abating." The Buddha then explained to Kassapa the sev limbs of wisdone (minfulness to equanity and said tht a mnk practicing them lean towards Nibbāna. This pleased Mahākassapa and his sickness went Vway. "

[196] 5. Sick monk 2. (Dutiyagilānasutta) Once when the Buddha was at Veluvana in Rajagaha the venerable Mahāmoggallāna was lying sickat Gijjhakūta close by. The rest of the sutta is the same as the visit of the Buddha to the sick Mahākssapa in the previous sutta.

[197] 6. Sick monk 3. (Tatiya gilānasutta) Once the Buddha was lying sick at Veluvana in Rajagaha. Then the venerable Mahācunda came to him. Then the Buddha asked Cunda to recite to him the sermon on the seven limbs of wisdom. This Cunda did going thugh the seven limbs (mindfulness to equanimity) and the sickness left the Buddha.

[198] 7. Nothing to cross over (Pāraṅgamasutta) The Buddha said: "If the seven limbs of wisdom are cultivated thoroughly then there is no this shore and no crossing over to the further shore. He then repeated the sermon on the seven limbs of wisdom (mindful;ness to equanimity).

[199] 8. Neglecting and doing, (Viraddhasutta) The Buddha said: "Whosoever neglects the seven limbs of wisdom neglects the Ariyan eightfold path and whosoever undertakes it also undertakes the eightfold path.

[200] 9. Ariyan (Ariyasutta) The Buddha said: "The seven limbs of wisdomif cultivated throughly are the Ariyan things which if which will lead to the utter destruction of suffering. They are mindfulness to equanimity. "

[201] 10. (sutta) The Buddha said: "The seven limbs of wisdom conduce to revulsion, dispassion, cessation, calm, and full comprehension. They lead to wisdom and Nibbāna. They are mindfulness to equanimity.

3. Udāyivagga – Udāyi

[202] 1. A monk. (Bodhāyasutta) A certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How far is the name Limbs of wisdom applicable ?" The Buddha said: "Because they conduce to wisdom. A monk cultivating them are based on seclusion, dispassion and cessation and ends in self surrender. They lead to wisdom."

[203] 2. Sermon. (Bhojjaṅgadesanāsutta) The Buddha said: "I will teach you the seven limbs of wisdom. They are the limbs of mindfulness, investigation of Dhamma, energy, joy, tranquillity, concentrating and equanimity."

[204] 3. Conditions. (Ṭhāniyasutta) The Buddha said: "Sensual desire, malevolence, Sloth and torpor, Excitement and flurry, and Doubt and wavering, all arise due to lack of attention paid to specific causes like lust and passion. The cultivation of the seven limbs of wisdom require much attention (mansikāra).

[205] 4. Unwise attention. (Ayonisomansikārasutta) The Buddha said: "To a person who gives unwise attention sensual desire, malevolence, sloth and torpor, excitement and doubt arise. Also the wings of wisdom do not arise. But with wise attention the opposite of these will occur."

[206] 5. Not declining. (Aparihāniyasutta) The Buddha said: "I will teach you seven things that do not decline. These are the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to tranquillity)."

[207] 6. Craving. (Taṇhakkhyasutta) The Buddha said: "The way to the destruction of craving is the seven limbs of wisdom". Then venerable Udāyi asked: "How does the wings of wisdom lead to the destruction of craving ?" The Buddha replied: "The monk cultivates the mindfulness limb which is based on seclusion, dispassion, and cessation. It results in boundless self-surrender. This leads to abandonment of craving. So also with the other limbs of wisdom. Thus the monk destroys craving. "

[208] 7. Craving ending. (Taṇhanirodhasutta) The Buddha said: "The way to the cessation of craving is the cultivation of the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to equanimity). Do practice it."

[209] 8. Penetration. (Nibbedhabhāgiyasutta) The Buddha said: "I will teach you the way leading to penetration. This is the seven limbs of wisdom." Then venerable Udāyi asked: "How do the limbs of wisdom lead to penetration?" The Buddha replied: "The monk cultivates the mindfulness limb which is based on seclusion, dispassion, and cessation. It results in boundless self-surrender. He then pierces through and breaks down the great mass of lust that hitherto had not been broken down. The same is done with the other limbs. That is how the seven limbs of wisdom conduce to penetration"

[210] 9. The one condition. (Ekadhammasutta) The Buddha said: "I do not see any other single condition that leads to unbinding than the seven limbs of wisdom. Here a monk cultivates it from mindfulness to equanimity. The things that bind are the eye, the ear, the nose, he tongue, the body and the mind. These are the conditions that bind.

[211] 10. Udāyi. (Udāyisutta) Once the Buddha was staying among the Sumbha at Desaka. Then venerable Udayi came to the Buddha and said: " I was formerly a householder. But I developed a great affection and respect for the Buddha and then I joined the Order. The Buddha taught me the Dhamma: This is how the body arises and perishes. This is feeling, perception, the activities and consciousness; their arising and perishing. Now when I had gone into solitude, while pondering over the rise and fall of these five factors of existence, I fully realized, as in truth it is, the meaning of suffering, its arising and ceasing. Also the practice that leads to the ceasing of suffering. I laid hold of the limbs of wisdom right up to equanimity, cultivating them thoroughly. I have laid hold of this path, which, cultivated thoroughly will lead me on, so that I shall come to know 'there is no more life in these conditions.' "
       The Buddha then said: "Well said ! Well said, Udayi ! Indeed you have laid hold of this way, which, cultivated thoroughly will lead you to the state of being such: so that you will come to know: 'Cut off is rebirth : lived is the holy life : done is the task : there is no more of being here for me.' ".

4. Nīvaraṇavagga – On Hindrances

[212] 1. The good 1. (Paṭhamakusalasutta) The Buddha said: "All good things are rooted in diligence (appamāda). A monk doing good is rooted in the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to equanimity)."

[213] 2. The Ggod 2. (Dutiyakusalasutta) The Buddha said: "All good things are rooted in wise attention (yonisomanasikāra). A monk doing good is rooted in the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to equanimity)."

[214] 3. Corruptions. (Upakilesasutta) The Buddha said: "Gold is corrupted by five things: iron, copper, tin, lead and silver. Similarly there are five corruptions of the mind (citta): sensual desire, malevolence, sloth and torpor, excitement and doubt. Those with a corrupted mind can be liberated by cultivating the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to equanimity)."

[215] 4. More corruptions. (Anupakilesasutta) The Buddha said: "The seven limbs of wisdom are without hindrance. Their thorough cultivation with an uncorrupted mind leads to realization of liberation by knowledge. These limbs are the seven from mindfulness to equanimity.

[216] 5. Unwise attention. (Ayonisomanasikārasutta) The Buddha said: "In those who practice unwise attention sensual desire, malevolence, sloth and torpor, excitement, and doubt arise; of if already arisen they increase."

[217] 6. Wise attention. (Yonisomaniskārasutta) The Buddha said: "In those who practice wise attention the limbs of wisdom rise, or if already arisen they go to full cultivation."

[218] 7. Increase and decrease. (sutta) The Buddha said: "These seven limbs of wisdom (from mindfulness to equanimity) if cultivated thoroughly go to increase (in wisdom) not to decrease."

[219] 8. Non-hindrance. (Āvaraṇnīvraṭnasutta) The Buddha said: "If the Ariyan disciple does not hinder the seven limbs of wisdom and cultivates them thoroughly with an uncorrupted mind they will promote liberation by wisdom. The hindrances are sensual desire, malevolence, sloth and torpor, excitement and doubt."

[220] 9. The tree. (Rukkhasutta) The Buddha said: "Trees such the bo-tree, various fig tees, bunyans, cedars and wood-apple trees grow from tiny seeds and become mighty overspreading trees others, until they ultimately  fall away. Similarly a house-holder who goes forth into homelessness but has lusts which grow until he ultimately falls down. The five hindrances are lust, malevolence, sloth and torpor, excitement and doubt. They can be overcome by the five limbs of wisdom (from mindfulness to equalnimity)."

[221] 10. Hindrance. (Nīvaraṇnasutta) The Buddha said: "The five hindrances (sensual desire to doubt) cause blindness and ignrorance which obstruct insight and does not conduce to Nibbāna. The seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to equanimity), they cause sight, knowledge, insight, are painless, and lead to Nibbāna."

5. Cakkavattivagga – The Wheel-roller.

[222] 1. Conceits. (Vidhāsutta) The Buddha said: "All recluses and brahmins who in the past have destroyed the three conceits [these are not named in this sutta] have done so by cultivating thoroughly the seven limbs of wisdom. Those who in the future will do so will also do so in the same way. "

[223] 2. The roller of the wheel. (Cakkavattisutta) The Buddha said: "When a wheel-rolling monarch appears so appears his seven treasures (the Wheel, the Elephant, the Horse, the Jewel, the Woman, the Housefather, and the Heir Apparent). Likewise with the appearance of a Tathāgata there appears the seven treasures of wisdom ( mindfulness, searching the Dhamma, energy, zest, tranquillity, concentration, and equanimity).

[224] 3. Crushing Māra (Mārasutta) The Buddha said: "The way of crushing the hosts of Māra is through the seven limbs of wisdom."

[225] 4. Not intelligent. (Dupaññasutta) A certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How far is the saying 'a foolish idiot' applicable?" The Buddha replied: "A person is called such when he is not cultivating the seven limbs of wisdom."

[226] 5. Intelligent. (Paññavantasutta) A certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How far is the saying 'intelligent not a fool' applicable?" The Buddha replied: "A person is called such when he is cultivating the seven limbs of wisdom."

[227] 6. Wretched (Daliddasutta) A certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How far is the saying 'A poor wretch' applicable?" The Buddha replied: "A person is called such when he is not cultivating the seven limbs of wisdom."

[228] 7. Well-to-do. (Adaliddasutta) A certain monk came to the Buddha and asked: "How far is the saying 'A well-to-do' applicable?" The Buddha replied: "A person is called such when he is cultivating the seven limbs of wisdom."

[229] 8. The sun. (Ādiccasutta) The Buddha said: "Just as the dawn is the harbringer of the rising of the sun so friendship with the wise is the forerunner of the cultivation of the seven limbs of wisdom."

[230] 9. Internal factor (Ajjhattikaṅgasutta) The Buddha said: "As to what concerns oneself I see no other single factor so powerful than wise attention to the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to equanimity).

[231] 10. External factor (Bāhiraṅgasutta) The Buddha said: "As to what concern things external to oneself I see no other single factor so powerful than wise attention to the seven limbs of wisdom (mindfulness to equanimity).

6. Sākaccavagga – Conversatin/h3> [232] 1. Food. (Āhārasutta) The Buddha said: "I will teach you food and non food for the five hindrances and the seven limbs of enlightenment.
       "As for the hindrances the food for sensual lust is the attractive side of things, that for malevolence is the repuslsive side of things, that for sloth and torpor is languor and over-eating, that for excitement is untranquillity of mind, that for wavering is doubt.
       "As for the limbs of wisdom the food for mindfulness is wise attention, that for investigation of Dhamma is wise attention given to good and bad and blameful and blameless things, that for energy is the putting forth of effort, that for rapture (pīti) is attention based on things leading to rapture, that for tranqility is wise attention paid for the mind, that for concentration is calmness, and that for equanimity is wise attention to things that oead to equanimity.
       "As for non-food for hindrances these are the opposite of those that lead to hindrances. Similarly the non-food for the arising of the limbs of wisdom are the opposite of those that lead to the arising of the limbs of wisdom. "

[233] 2. Synonym. Pariyāyasutta) Once some monks went to a gathering of wanderers of another sect for a discussion. The wanderers then told the monks: "Your teacher asks you to avoid the five hindrances and cultivate the seven limbs of wisdom. Our teacher also asks us to avoid the five hindrances and cultivate the seven limbs of wisdom. So what is the difference between you and us ? " The monks did not answer the wanderers but went away. Later they visited the Buddha and related their experience and asked the Buddha how they should have answered the wanderers. The Buddha said: "You should tell the wanderers that there is as synonym under which the five hindrances become ten and the seven limbs of wisdom become fourteen. This would establish a distinction between us and these wanderers. Thus each of the hindrances could be considered internally as relating to oneself and externally as relating to others. Similarly there is a twofold intepretation of the limbs of widom. They could be considered internally as referring to oneself and exernally as referring to others. This twofold interpretation of hindrances and limbs of wisdom esablishes the distinction between our way and their way.".

[234] 3. Fire. (Aggisutta) Here another set of monks have the experience as the monks in the previous sutta and were asked the same question by the wanderers. They too could not answer the wanderes and came to the Buddha who gave a different answer to be given to the wanderers. The Buddha said: "Which limb of wisdom should be cultivate depends on the state of the mind. It will be different when the mind is elated and when it is not. The wanderers will not be able to answer this beyond them. Only a Tathāgata can answer it.
       "If the mind is not elated then concentration or equnimity or tranquility cannot be cultivated. It would be like starting a fire with wet fuel. Then only investigation of Dhamma can be cultivated. But if the mind is elated then investigation, energy and rapture should not be cultivated. It is like to put out a fie with dust. It is time to cultivate concentration or equnimity or tranquility. "

[235] 4. Loving-kindness (Mettāsahagatasutta) Once when the Buddha was at Hakiddavasana in the Koliya country some monks entered into a discussion with wanderers of another sect. The wanderers said: "Gotama the recluse instructs his followers to suffuce all directions with thoughts of loving-kindness, compassion, sympathy and equanimty. We are also instructed to do the same. So what is the difference beween you and us ?" The monks could not answer this and left. Later they posed this question to the Buddha. The Buddha said: "The wanderers should be asked with regards to loving-kidness, compassion, sympathy and equanimity these questions: 'How is the mind released, what is its goal, its excellence , its fruit and its ending ?' The wanderers will not be able to answer as they are beyond them. Only a Tathāgata can answer.
       "The release of mind in each case comes through cultivating each limb of wisdom with each quality (loving-kindness and so on) that is suffused in each direction. He abides conscious of repugnance in what is not repugnant, indifferent, mindful and self-possessed. Or he could pass beyond the sphere of conciousness to the spher of the infinity of space, or the sphere of nothingness or a realm even beyond that.".

[236] 5. Sangarava. (Saṅgāravasutta) Once the brahmin Saṅgārava came to the Buddha and asked why he cannot recollect chants he had memorized some days back while he recollected chants he had not memorized. The Buddha said that not recollecting what had been committed to memory in the past was because the mind is beset with the five hindrances (sensual desire, malevolence, sloth , excitement and doubt). He compared it a man looking at bowl of water which was not clear but disturbed in various ways and did not see his reflection in the water. But if his mind is free and no tseeing his reflection in it. But if his mind is free of the five hindranceds he could recollect not only what he had committed to memory but also chants he had not memorized in the past. He compared this to a person looking into a bowl of clear water and seeing his reflection in it. Then the Buddha instructed Saṅgārava on the seven limbs of wisdom. Saṅgārava became a follower of the Buddha.

[237] 6. Abhaya (Abhayasutta) When the Buddha ws in Gujjakuta in Rajgaha Prince Abhaya came to the Buddha and ssaid: "him ddha and said: "Pūrna Kassapa says there is no condition or cause for not seeing and not knowing. What does the Buddha say ?" The Buddha said: "There is a cause and a condition but if a person is subjected to the five hindrances he does nto see the cause or condition. In order to see cause and condition a person must cultivate the seven limbs of wisdom." Tne Buddha then instructed Prince Abhaya on the seven limbs of wisdom. Prince Abhaya grasped the Dhamma and said that the fatigue he experienced in climbing the Gijjakuta had left him,

7. Ānāpānavagga – In breathing and out breathing

[238] 1. The skeleton. (Aṭṭhikamahappalasutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of the skeleton can be used to cultivate the six limbs of wisdom and has six advantages: (i) is of great fruit (mahappala), (ii) leads to realization now or no return (aññataraphala), (iii) is of great materal benefit (mahto atta), (iv) is free of bondage (yogakkhema), (v) gives strong emotion (mahato saṃvega) and (vi) ease of living (phāsuvihāra)."

[239] 2. Worm-eaten, (Puḷavakasutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of being worm-eaten'.

[240] 3. Discoloured. (Vinīsutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of being discoloured'.

[241] 4. Fissured (Vicchiddakasutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of being fissured.

[242] 5. Inflated. (Uddhumātakasutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of being inflated'.

[243] 6. Goodwill. (Mettāsutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of goodwill'.

[244] 7. Compassion. (Karuṇāsutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of equanimitycompassion'.

[245] 8. Sympathy (Upekkhāsutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of sympathy'



[246] 9. Equanimity (sutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of Equanimity'

[247] 10. Inbreathing and outbreathing. (sutta) Same as sutta [238] with 'idea of skeleton' replaced by "idea of Inbreathing and outbreathing'

8. Nirodhavagga – Cessation

[248] 1. The foul, (Asubhasutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of the foul, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[249] 2. Death. (Maraṇasutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of death, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[250] 3. Repulsive. (Āhārepaṭikūlasutta The Buddha said: "The idea of the foul, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[251] 4. Distaste (Anabhirtisutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of distaste, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[252] 5. Impermanene (sutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of impermanance, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[253] 6. Suffering. (sutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of suffering, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[254] 7. No self. (Anattasutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of no self, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[255] 8. Abandoning. (Pahānasutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of abandoning, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[256] 9. Dispassion. (Virāgasutta) The Buddha said: " The idea of dispassion, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

[257] 10. Cessation (Nirodhasutta) The Buddha said: "The idea of cessation, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great fruit and great profit."

9. Gaṅgāpeyyālavagga – Ganges repetition

[258-269] These 12 suttas are a repetition of the Ganges chapter in the Samyutta No. 35 on the Eightfold path (suttas [91-102] with the reference changed to the 'seven limbs of wisdom' )

10. Appamādavagga – On diligence

[270-279] These 10 suttas are a repetition of the Diligence chapter in the Samyutta No. 35 on the Eightfold path (suttas [139-148] in reference to the 'seven limbs of wisdom' )

11. Bālakaraṇāyavagga – On Deeds needing strengh

[280-291] These 12 suttas are a repetition of the Strengthe chapter in the Samyutta No. 35 on the Eightfold path (suttas [149-161] in reference to the 'seven limbs of wisdom' )

12. Esanāvagga – On Longing

[292-301] These 12 suttas are a repetition of the Longing chapter in the Samyutta No. 35 on the Eightfold path (suttas [162-171] in reference to the 'seven limbs of wisdom' )

13. Oghavagga – On Flood

[302-311] These 12 suttas are a repetition of the Flood chapter in the Samyutta No. 35 on the Eightfold path (suttas [172-181] in reference to the 'seven limbs of wisdom' )

[302-311] Reiteration of the Ganges repetition [253-268].

[312-323] Second reiteration of the Ganges repetition [253-268].

[324-333] Reiteration of the Diligence repetition [270-279].

[334-345] Reiteration of the Strength repetition [280-296].

[346-356] Reiteration of the Lomging repetition [267-301].

[357-366] Reiteration of the Flood repetition [302-311].