Saṃyutta Nikāya– Book of Kindred Sayings

5. Mahāvagga – 5. The great Chapter

51. Iddhipādasaṃyutta 51. Kindred Sayings on Psychic abilities

1. Cāpālavagga – The Cāpāla shrine

[813] 1. Neither shore. (Apārasutta) The Buddha said: "There are four bases of psychic power: desire (chanda), energy (vīriya), thought (citta), and investigation (vīmaṃsā). Each of these should be developed together with concentration (samādhi) and struggle (vippdana). To cultivate these is not to go to this shore or to the other shore."

b>[814] 2. Neglect. (Viraddhasutta) The Buddha said: "A monk who does not to develop these bases is not following the Ariyan path. He who cultivates these bases thoroughly is an Ariyan leading to the utter destruction of suffering."

[815] 3. The Ariyan. (Ariyasutta) The Buddha said: "He who cultivates these four bases of psychic power throughly is an Ariyan leading to the utter destruction of suffering."

[816] 4. Revulsion. (Nibbidāsutta) The Buddha said: "Cultivating these four bases of psychic power leads to revulsion, dispassion and Nibbāna."

[817] 5. Part accomplishment. (Iddhipadersasutta) The Buddha said: "Recluses or brahmins who in the past , present or future succed in partial accomplishment of psychic power have used these four bases."

[818] 6. Perfect. (Samattasutta) Same as above sutta replacing "partial" with "perfect".

[819] 7. The bhikkhu. (Bhikkhusutta) The Buddha said: "Whatsoever monk whether in the past, present or future who by the elimination of the intoxicaions dwell in the releast ol mind (cetovimutti) do so by cultivating the five bases of psychic power."

[820] 8. The Buddha. (Buddhasutta) The Buddha said: "It is because of the through cultivation of the four bases of psychic power that the Tathāgata is called the Arahant or Enlightened One."

[821] 9. Knowledge. (Ñðāṇasutta) The Buddha said: "At the thought that desire, energy, thought and investigation are the bases of psychic power, a thing unheard of before, light and vision arose in me."

[822] 10. The shrine. (Cetiyasutta) Once the Buddha was staying in Vesali when after his alms round and meal he asked venerable Ananda to accompany him to the Cāpāla shrine. There Buddha said: "Delightful is Vesali and its many shrines. Whosoever has unddertaken the four bases of psychic power can live for the full span of life." This is taken as a hint from the Buddha for Ananda to invite the Buddha to live to the full span of life. But because Ananda's mind was beset by Māra he did not do so. The Buddha then repeated his statement for the second with the same result. Then the Buddha asked Ananda to do as he wished and Ananda went away to medidate.
       Then Māra came to the Buddha and asked him to pass away (die). This the Buddha rejected. For the second and third times Māra made the same request, and these requests too were rejected. Finally the Buddha said to Māra: "Do not trouble yourself. In not too long a time, in fact in three months time, the Tatāgata will pass away utterly." This is taken as the Buddha rejecting his full life span.

2. Pāsādakampanavagga – 2. The Shaking of the house

[823] 1. Before. (Pubbasutta) The Buddha said: "Before my Enlightenment I wondered on the reasons for undertaking the four bases of psychic power. Then I thought as follows:".
       "A monk undertakes the desire base of psychic power in order not to be too sluggish or too strained. He should be fully concious of what is in front as what is behind, what is up as what is down, what is by night as by day. With mind unhampered and and alert he cutltivates the desire base excellently. He does the same with the energy, thought and investigation bases of psychic power. "
       "A monk who has cultivated the four bases of psychic power throughly enjoys many psychic powers – from being one he becomes many and returns back to being one; he becomes visible or invisible; he goes unhindered through a wall, a rampart, or a mountain; he dives and emerges into the earth as if it were water; he walks upon water as if it were solid ground; he flies cross-legged through the air like a bird; he can touch and stroke the moon and the sun; his power extends to the world of Brahma. He develops the divine eye and the divine ear; he can read the mind of others; he can reall his previous births in great detail. He destroys the intoxicants, and secures the liberation of mind even in this very life."

[824] 2. Great fruit.(Mahapphalasutta) The Buddha said: "The four bases of psychic power, if cultivated throughly are of great fruit and great profit.

[825] 3. Desire. (Chandasamādhisutta) The Buddha said: "The co-factor of concentation of the desire base of psychic power is developing one-poinedness of mind. The co-factor of struggling means making an effort not to generate desire for unskilful states and making an effort to abandon unskilful states that may have arisen. Similarly with regard to confusion and re-becoming. That is why this base of psychic poer is called the psychic power which features desire, together with the co-factors of concentration and struggle."

[826] 4. Moggallṇāna. (Moggallānasutta) Once the Buddha was staying in the terraced house of Migāramātā in which some undiciplined monks were lodging on the ground floor. Then the Buddha called on venerable Mogallāna to shake up these uncontrolled monks. Moggallāna with his little toe shook the whole building which created panic among the unruly monks. The Buddha then came down to them and asked what the matter was. They said that a miracle had happenned and the house had shaken. Then the Buddha said: "It was venerable Moggallāna who did it with his little toe in order to shake you up. He has perfected the four bases of psychic power of desire, energy, thought and investigation with their co-factors of concentration and struggle. This has given him these enormous powers as well as the destruction of the intoxicants and has achieved release of mind by insight."

[827] 5. Uṇṇābha brahmin. (Uṇṇābhabrāhmaṇasutta) Once in Kosmbi the Brahmin Uṇṇābha visited the venerable Ananda and asked for what the holy life was lived under Gotama. Ananda replied that it was to end desire (chanda). Then the Brahmin wanted to know how this is done. Ananda replied that it was by developing the desire and energy bases of psychic power. The Brahmin asked that when one desire is eliminated another would arise and so this would be an endless task. He wanted to know if there is an end to this. Ananda answered that this happens when the intoxications are desroyed and the monk becomes an Arahant. This explanation pleased the Brahmin who said that he would become a lay follower of Ananda.

[828] 6. Recluses and brahmins 1. (Paṭhamasamanabrāhmanasutta) The Buddha said: "Recluses sand Brahmins of the past, present and future can gain mighty magic power (mahānubhāva)only by developing the four bases of psychic power. "

[829] 7. Recluses and brahmins 2. (Dutiyasamanabrāhmanasutta) The Buddha said: "Recluses sand Brahmins of the past, present and future can gain supernormal abilities (such as those listed in sutta [823]) only by developing the four bases of psychic power. "

[830] 8. Monk. (Bhikkhusutta) The Buddha said: "It is by cultivating throughly the four bases of psychic power that a monk, destroys the intoxicants, and realizes the liberation of mind even in this life. "

[831] 9. Psychic powers. (Iddhādidesanṇsutta) The Buddha said: "I will teach you how to acquire psychic powers (as those listed in sutta [823]). This is by the cultivation of the four bases of psychic power: desire, energy thought and investigation. The practice that leads to this is just the Aryan eightfold path. "

[832] 10. Analysis. (Vibhaṅgasutta) The Buddha said: "The four bases of psychic power yeild great fruit. As for the first of these, the base of desire, the monk shall not be over-sluggish (atilīno) that is indolent, nor yet overstrained (atipaggahito) that is overexcited. He shall not be inwardly cramped (ajjhattaṃ saṃkhitto) nor outwardly diffuse (bahiddhā vikkhitto) that is associated with sensual delights." So he abides fully conscious of what is behind (pacca) and what is before (pure) him, what is below (ado) as what is above (uddahaṃ) him (that is contemplating the body from top to bottom and vice versa), as what is by day (divā) as what is by night (rattiṃ). Thus is his mind made brilliant. And just as the monk thus cultivates the base of desire so should also cultivate the other three bases of psychic power, that is energy, thought, and investigation."

3. Ayoguḷavagga – ? Chapter on the iron ball

[833] 1.The way. (Maggasutta) The Buddha said: "Before I was enlightened I thought what the way towards the achievement of psychic power was. Then it ocurred to me that it was the practice of the bases of desire, energy, thought and investigation. This will lead to the acquiring of the super-normal powers. "

[834] 2. The iron ball.(Ayogulasutta) Once the venerable Ananda came to the Buddha and asked: "Can the Buddha reach the Brahma world in his mind-made body ?". The Buddha said he could. Then Ananda asked: "Can the Buddha reach the Brahma world in his physical body ?". The Buddha said that too he could. Then Ananda said that it was a wonder and a marvel. Then the Buddha said: "Just as an iron ball when heated becomes pliable so whenever the Tathāigata concentrates body in mind and mind in body, and abides in the consciousness of bliss and buoyancy, he can with little effort rises up from the ground into the air (and acquire the other abiities listed in sutta [823])". This includes the power to go to the Brahma world with his physical body.

[835] 3. The bhikkhu. (Bhikkhusutta) The Buddha said: "The monk who cultivates the four bases of psychic power together with their co-factors by destroying the intoxications, even in this very life, realizes by his own unaided power the release of mind, the release by insight, and having attained it dwells therein."

[836] 4. Purity. (Suddhikasutta) Same as the previous sutta.

[837] 5. Fruits 1. (Paṭhamaphalsasutta) The Buddha said: "Cultivating the four bases of psychic power throughly one can expect two fruits: either the full realization in this very life or the state of non-return,

[838] 6. Fruits 2. (Dutiyaphalsasutta) The Buddha said: "Cultivating he four bases of psychic power can have seven fruits: "In this very life one establishes realization; if not at the moment of death; if not having worn down the five fetters of the lower sort one wins release midway; if not does so by the reduction of his time; if not he passes away without much trouble; if not with some trouble; if not he goes upstream."

[839] 7. Ananda 1. (Paṭhamaānandasutta) Once venerable Ananda went to the Buddha and asked: "What is psychic power, what is its base, and what leads to it?". The Buddha said: "Psychic power are super normal powers like form one becoming many. The bases of psychic power are those that lead to it. The four bases are thre desire, energy, thought and ivestigation. The practice that leads to it is the Ariyan eighrfold path. "

[840] 8. Ananda 2. (Dutiyaānandasutta) Same as the previous suta.

[841] 9. Monk 1. (Paṭhamabhikkhusutta) A number of bhikkhus came to see the Buddha and asked the Buddha the same question that venerable Ananda asked in sutta [839]. They got the same answer.

[842] 10. Monks 2. (Dutiyabhikkhusutta) The same as the previous suta.

ā [843] 11. Moggallāna. (Moggallānasutta) The Buddha said: "It is by cultivating throughly the four bases of psychic power that venerable Moggallāna is of such mighty magic power and majesty. He cultivates desire, energy, thought and investigation, together with the co-factors of concentration and struggle (as in sutta [832]) making his mind briliant."

[844] 12. Thatāgata. (Tathāgatasutta) The same as the previous sutta with 'Moggallāna' replaced by 'Tathāgata'.

4. Gaṅgāpeyyālavagga – 4. The Ganges repetition

[845-856] 1-12. (Pācīnādisuttadvādasaka) [These 12 sutta is the Ganges repetition in which the Buddha says that just as the Ganges flows to the east [or in some to the ocean] so a person cultivating the four bases of psychic power flows towards Nibbāna.

5. Appamādavagga – Deeds needing strength repetition

[857-866] 1-10. (Tathāgatādisuttadasaka) [These 10 suttas give the diligence repetition. These suttas are not repeated in the Pali text. The ten are: Tathāgata, Foot, Peaked hall. Wood, Heart-wood, Jasmine, Prince, Moon and Sun, and Cloth.]

6. Balakaranīyavagga – The Diligence repetition

[867-878] 1-12. (Balādisuttadvādasaka) [These 12 suttas give the 'Strength' repetition, originally given in sutta [149-160] adapted from the Path Kindered Sayings to the current sayings. They are omitted in the Pali text. The twelve are: Strength, Seed and Snake, Tree with Pointed Wheat, Sky, Raincloud1, Raincloud2, Ship, For all comers, and River.]

7. Esanavagga – The Longing repetition

[879-890] 1-1. (Esanādisuttadasaka) [These 12 suttas give the 'Longing' repetition, originally given in sutta [161-170] adapted from the Path Kindered Sayings to the current sayings. These suttas are not repeated in the Pali text. The ten are: Longing, Conceits, Asavas, Becoming, Suffering, Obstruction1, Obstruction 2, Obstructin 3,Stain and Pain and Feelings,]

8. Oghavagga – The Flood

[890-898] 1-10. (ôghādisuttadasaka) [These 10 suttas give the 'Flood' repetition, originally given in sutta [171-179] adapted from the Path Kindered Sayings. They are omitted in the Pali text. The ten are: Flood, Bonds, Grasping, Ties and tendency, Sense-plesures, Hindrances, Factors, Lower fetters, Higher fetters.]

52. Anuruddhasaṃyutta 49. Kindred Sayings on Anuruddha

1. Rahogatavagga – 1. Chapter on Solitude

[899] 1. Solitude 1. (Paṭhamarahogatasutta) Once venerable Anuruddha was meditating at Sāvattahi when this thought occurred to him: "Whosoever undertake the four stations of mindfulness also undertakes the Ariyan path that leads to utter destruction of suffering". Venerable Moggallāna discerned what Anuruddha was thinking and (magically) came before him asked: "To what extent are the four stations of mindfulness undertaken ? " Anuruddha gave a long account of a monk undertaking the the four stations of mindfulness including the following: His contemplation of the body includes contemplation of feelings, mind and mind-states. He is always conscious of repulsion even which contemplation the non-repulsive. He contemplates the rise and fall of things both inwardly and outwardly.

[900] 2. Solitude 2. (Dutiyahamarahogatasutta) This is the same as the previouus sutta where venerable Anuruddha explains to venerable Moggallāna about contemplation on the stations of mindfulness.

[901] 3. (sutta) Once when venerable Anuruddha was at the bank of the river Satanu some monks came to him and asked: "By cultivating what did venerable Anuruddha achieve great super normal power? " Anuruddha answered: "It is by cultivting the four stations of mindfulness that I did so. I can recognize if a state is mean, middling or excellent."

[902] 4. Cactus Grove 1.(Paṭhamakaṇḍakīsutta) Once at Saketa venerables Sāriputta and Moggallāna came to venerable Anuruddha when all three were living there. Then Sāriputta asked: "What states should be abandoned by a pupil monk after he has attained them ?". Anuruddha said a pupil should abandon the four stations of mindfulness after he has attained them.

[903] 5. Cactus Grove 2. (Dutiyamakaṇḍakīsutta) Venerable Sāriputta asked: "What states should be abandoned by a monk who is an upasampada after he has attained them ?". Anuruddha said a pupil should abandon the four stations of mindfulness after he has attained them.

[904] 6. Cactus Grove 3. (Tatiymakaṇḍakīsutta) Venerble Sāriputta asked: "By cultivating what states have you come to such mighty power ?" Anuruddha answered: "It is by cultivating the four stations of mindfulness."

[905] 7. The destruction of craving. (Taṇhakkhayasutta) Venerable Anuruddha said: The four stations of mindfulness when cultivated thoroughly lead to the destruction of craving."

[906] 8. Sal tree hut. (Salaḷāgārasutta) Once when venerable Anuruddha was staying at the Sal-tree hut in Sāvatthi he addressed the monks: "The Ganges flows to the East and a group of men with picks and baskets cannot make it flow West. Just so a monk who is practicing the four stations of mindfulness cannot be tempted by the King's ministers or others by the offer of wealth to return to the household life.".

[907] 9. (sutta) Once when venerables Sāriputta and Anuruddha were staying at Ambapāli's Park in Vesali. Sāriputta came to Anuruddha and said: "You are serene, clear and shining. How do you spend your time?". Anuruddha said: "I spend my time in mindfulness contemplating the body as transient in feelings, mind and mind-states. This is how an Arhant who is fully liberaed dwells. " Sāriputta said: "It is well to have spent time with venerable Anuruddha listening to his majestic speech." 

[908] 10. Seriously ill. (Bāḷhagilānasutta) One when venerable Anuruddha was living in Sāvatthi he became seriously ill. Then some monks came to his and said: "Now that venerable Anuruddha is experiencing pains from his grave illness does it not affect his mind." Anuruddha said: "Because I am well grounded in the four stations of mindlulness even when I am experiencing pains from illness it does not affect my mind."

2. Dutiyavagga – 2. The second Chapter

[909] 1. Thousand times. (sutta) Once at Sāvatthi the venerable Anuruddha addressed a number of monks giving a list of  the psychic powers he acquired by cultivating the four stations of mindfulness." He then listed 12 powers each of which is given as a separate sutta. These suttas are listed below sequentially using the numbers assigned to them in the Sixth Convocation (saṇgāyanaya).

[910] 2. From being one I become many . . . even as far as the Brahma World I have power with my body.
[911] 3. With the deva-, power of hearing, purified and surpassing that of man, I hear sounds both of devas and of men, both far and near.
[912] 4. I read and know the minds of beings, of other persons. I know the lustful mind as lustful, the liberated mind as liberated.
[913] 5. I know as it really is the cause of thing, and what is not the cause.
[914] 6. I know in its cause and condition of the fruit of actions done in past, future and present times.
[915] 7. I know, as it really is, all the directions of each practice.
[916] 8. I know the world as it really is, in its divers shapes and forms. 18] 10.
[917] 9. I know, as they really are, the divers characters of beings.
[918] 10. I know, as they really are, the natures of the minds of other beings.
[919] 10. I know, as they really are, the corruption, purification and uprisings of the attainments in trance.
[920] 11. I can remember my divers existences in the past with all details and characteristics.
[921] 12. With the deva-sight I discern beings going and coming according to their merits.

[922] 13. The intoxications. (Āsāvakkayasutta) Venerable Anuruddha concluded: "By cultivating thoroughly the four stations of mindfulness, by destroying the asavas, in this very life, by myself, I attain and abide in that release of mind, that release by insight.

[923-934] 1-12. (Pācīnādisuttadvādasaka) [These 12 suttas give the Ganges repetition. The Buddha said that there are four trances (jhāna). Just as the Ganges flows to the east [or in some suttas to the ocean] so a person cultivating the four trances flows towards Nibbāna.

9. Appamādavagga – The Diligence (Ernestness)  repetition

[935-944] 1-10. (Tathāgatādisuttadasaka) [These 10 suttas give the diligence repetition. These suttas are not repeated in the Pali text. The ten are: Tathāgata, Foot, Peaked hall. Wood, Heart-wood, Jasmine, Prince, Moon and Sun, and Cloth.]

10 Balakaranīyavagga – The Deeds requiring Strength repetition

[945-956] 1-12. (Balādisuttadvādasaka) [These 12 suttas give the 'Strength' repetition, originally given in sutta [149-160] adapted from the Path Kindered Sayings to the current sayings. They are omitted in the Pali text. The twelve are: Strength, Seed and Snake, Tree with Pointed Wheat, Sky, Raincloud1, Raincloud2, Ship, For all comers, and River.]

11. Esanavagga – The Longing repetition

[957-966] 1-10. (Esanādisuttadasaka) [These 10 suttas give the 'Longing' repetition, originally given in suttas [161-170] adapted from the Path Kindered Sayings to the current sayings. These suttas are not repeated in the Pali text. The ten are: Longing, Conceits, Asavas, Becoming, Suffering, Obstruction1, Obstruction 2, Obstructin 3,Stain and Pain and Feelings,]

12. Oghavagga – The Flood repetition

[967-976] 1-10. (Oghādisuttadasaka) [These 10 suttas give the 'Flood' repetition, originally given in sutta [171-179] adapted from the Kindered Sayings on the Path. They are omitted in the Pali text. The ten are: Flood, Bonds, Grasping, Ties and tendency, Sense-pleasures, Hindrances, Factors, Lower fetters, Higher fetters.]

53. Ānāpānasaṃyutta – 54. Kindred Sayings on In-and-Out-breathing

1. Ekadhammavagga – 2. The Chapter on one Dhamma

[977] 1. The one condition. (Ekadhammasutta) The Buddha said: "Concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing when cultivated thoroughly is of great fruit and profit. Here a monk goes to the foot of a tree or a lonely place, sits down cross-legged, holding the body straight he breathes in mindfully and breathes out mindfully . He knows if the breath is long or short, if it goes through the whole body calming down the body and the mental factors.

[978] 2. Limb of wisdom. (Bojjaṅgasutta) The Buddha said: "Here the monk cultivates the limbs of wisdom Mindfulness, Dhamma investigation, zest, tranquillity, concentration, and equanimity accompanied by concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing, which tends to seclusion (viveka), to dispassion (virāga), to cessation (nirodha), that ends in self-surrender (vossaggapariṇāma).

[979] 3. The pure. (Suddhikasutta) In this sutta the Buddha says that the cultivation of in- and out-rething as described in sutta [977] is of great furit and benefit.

[980] 4. Fruits 1. (Paṭhanphalasutta) This is the same as above with two fruits mentioned either realization of the goal in this life or the state of non-return.

[981] 5. Fruits 2. (Dutiyaphalasutta) This is the same as the above except that the number of fruits to be expected is increased to seven: Liberation in this life; if not at the moment of death; if not release midway by ending the five lower fetters; if not reducing his time; if not without much trouble; if not with some trouble; if not he goes to a heavenly destination.

[982] 6. Ariṭṭha. (Ariṭṭhasutta) Venerable Ariṭṭha came to the Buddha and said: "I practice in- and out-breathing by abandoning sensual desire for lusts now and in the future both inwardly and outwardly. I discipline perfectly the consciousness of repugnance for things. Then I mindfully breathe in and out." While not saying that this is not correct the Buddha described the method he had given in sutta [977].

[983] 7. Mahākappina. (Mahākappinasutta) Once the Buddha pointed to Mahākappina who was sitting close by cross-legged calm and still and said: "It is by concentration that one can achieve such calmness. It results from concentration on in- and out-breathing. Then there is no wavering of shaking of the body or of the mind. "

[984] 8. The lamp. (Padīpopamasutta) The Buddha said: "Before my enlightenment I too was practising in- and out-breathing. My body and mind were not fatigued and I became free of the intoxications. A monk should abandon all worldly attachments. He should dwell showing repugnance even to things that are not repugnant. He should be aloof from all sensuality and enter the first trance (jhāna). He should then develop one-pointed of mind which leads to the second trance. Next by entering the state which is neither pain nor pleasure he enters the fourth trance which is utter purity of mindfulness. Then passing beyond that he reaches the infinity of space and next the infinity of conciousness. Next comes the sphere of nothingness and following that the sphere of neither-consciousness-nor-unconciousness. Finally comes the ceasing of consciousness and sensation. All the time he must be giving attention to in-breathing and out-breathing.

[985] 9. Vesāli. (Vesaāisutta) Once the Buddha was in Vesāli at the Great Wood when he addressed the monks on the subject of the ugly (asubha). After that he said he would dwell in solitude for a half-month and no one should approach him except the one bringing him food. The monks continued their discussion of the ugly and some said that the Buddha had preached that the body was full of repugnant things. Some monks developed a loathing for the body (because it contained many impurities) and some felt that they could not continue to live with such a body. Some 30 such monks even killed themselves. When the Buddha returned after his period of solitude he noted that the number of monks had declined. When he was told what had happened he asked Ananda to summon all the monks in the Vesāli area. When the monks had assembled in the service hall he told them: "Intent concentration on in- and out-breathing if cultivated thoroughly is something peaceful, perfect and excellent and it is a pleasant way of living. It acts against evil and unprofitable states." He concluded with the analogy of the rains ending a hot, dry, and dusty summer.

[986] 10. Kimila. (Kimilasutta) Once while at the Veluvana the Buddha asked the venerable Kimila: "Tell me how profitable is intense concentration on in- and out-breathing ?" But Kamila did not answer even though the question was repeated twice. Then Ananda said that it is now the time for the Buddha to instruct us on this. Then the Buddha started by repeating what he had said in sutta [977]. Then he added more detail on what the monk should think when he inhales and exhales.

2. Dutiyavagga – 2. The Second Chapter

[987] 1. Icchānaṅgala. (Icchānaṅgalasutta) Once while in the Icchānaṅgala jungle the Buddha said that he wished to stay in solitude for three months. After this period he addressed the monks thus: "If wanderers of other views ask how the Thathāgata spends the rainy period you should say that he spends it doing in- and out- breathing concentration. This is the Ariyan way of life, the Tathāgata's way of life. For learner monks it is a way of getting rid of the intoxications (āsava). For Arahants who have already done this it conduces to pleasant living."

[988] 2. Doubt. (Kaṅkeyyasutta) In Kapilavatthu the Sakyan Mahānāma asked venerable Lomasakaṃbhiyo: "Is the lerner's way of life the same as that of the Tathāgata or different?" Lomasakaṃbhiyo said: "They are different. The lerner may aspire to get rid of the five hindrances (sensual desire, resentment, sloth and torpor, excitement and worry, doubt and wavering) and might abandon them. But the Arahant has cut off these hindrances at the very root." He then described the Tathaāgata's way of life as given in the previos sutta.

[989] 3. Ananda 1. (Paṭhamaanandasutta) Once Ananda came to the Budddha and asked: "Is there one state which when cultivated completes four states; four states which completes seven states; and seven states which lead to two states ?" The Buddha said: " There are. Concentration on in-and-out breathing leads to the four stations of mindfulness. These in turn lead to the seven limbs of enlightenment, and finally this leads to knowledge and release." He then described each of these in detail.

[990] 4. Ananda 2. (Dutiyaānamdasutta) This is same as the previous sutta.

[991] 5. Monks 1. (Paṭhamabhikkhusutta) Here a group of monks ask the same question as asked by Ananda in sutta [989]. They get the same reply.

[992] 6. Monks 2. (DutiyaBhikkhusutta) Same as the previous sutta.

[993] 7. Fetters. (Saṃyojanaappahānasutta) The Buddha said: "Concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing leads to the abandoning of the fetters."

[994] 8. Tendency. (sutta) The Buddha said: "Concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing (as in sutta [977]) leads to the complete destruction of tendency."

[995] 9. The path.(Addhānapariññāsutta) The Buddha said: "Concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing (as in sutta [977]) leads to thorough knowledge of the path."

[996] 10. Destruction of the intoxicants. (Āsavakkhayasutta) The Buddha said: "Concentration on in-breathing and out-breathing (as in sutta [977]) leads to the destruction of the intoxicants.